Covariance

A statistical measure of the degree to which random variables move together.
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Covariance

A measure of the extent to which two economic or statistical variables move up and down together. For two variables x and y with values xi, yi, i=1,…,n, the covariance is cov(x,y) = Si=1…n(xi-m(x))(yi-m(y)), where m(·) is the mean of the values in its argument.
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Covariance

A statistical measure of the degree to which two variables (e.g., securities' returns) move together. A positive value means that, on average, they move in the same direction.
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Covariance

A measure of the comovement between two variables.
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covariance

[n] - statistical measure of the variance of two random variables measured in the same mean time period
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Covariance

The variation in common between two related variables. See also Analysis of covariance.
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Covariance

A measure of the strength of the relationship between two numbers...more on Covariance
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Covariance

A measure of the joint variability of a pair of numeric variables. It is based upon the sum of crossproducts of the values other variables.AutocovarianceThe degree to which a time signal is correlated with itself.Cross CovarianceThe degree to which two time signals are correlated.
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covariance

noun (statistics) the mean value of the product of the deviations of two variates from their respective means
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covariance

(ko-vār´e-әns) a measure of the tendency of two random variables to vary together. It is the expected value of the product of the deviations of corresponding values of two random variables from their respective means.
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covariance

(from the article `probability theory`) ...and â = () (). The numerator of the expression for is called the covariance of and and is denoted Cov(, ). Let = â + denote the optimal ...
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Covariance

A statistical measure showing the degree to which variables move together. Discover What It`s Like to Live Easy With EquiTrend
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covariance

The tendency of two random variables to move in tandem. This is important in applications such as survey-taking and sociology, as well as in many branches of science, because, if two things tend to vary together, there is a good chance they may be causally linked. Related entry &nbs...
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Covariance

Random variables whose covariance is zero are called uncorrelated. The units of measurement of the covariance Cov(x, y) are those of x times those of y. By contrast, correlation coefficients, which depend on the covariance, are a dimensionless measure of linear dependence. (In fact, correlation coefficients can simply be understood as a normalized...
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Covariance

In bonds, notes, or other fixed income securities, the stated percentage rate of interest, usually p
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