Constable

A constable is a person holding a particular office, most commonly in law enforcement. The office of constable can vary significantly in different jurisdictions. A constable is commonly the rank of an officer within the police. ==Etymology== Historically, the title comes from the Latin comes stabuli (attendant to the stables) and originated from t...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constable

Constable

A man responsible for the day-to-day running of a castle belonging to a Medieval authority. He may have special military, or social, responsibilities.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20766

constable

an (unpaid) officer appointed from the ranks of local householders on a rotating basis; the constable served for a year at a time, to make arrests, conduct searches, among other duties. Additional temporary 'acting' constables might also be sworn in for specific occasions if there were fears of public disorder. See also *high/head constable, *pett...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21814

Constable

• (n.) An officer of the peace having power as a conservator of the public peace, and bound to execute the warrants of judicial officers. • (n.) A high officer in the monarchical establishments of the Middle Ages.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/constable/

constable

noun a police officer of the lowest rank
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

constable

noun a lawman with less authority and jurisdiction than a sheriff
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Constable

Con'sta·ble (kŭn'stȧ*b'l) noun [ Middle English conestable , constable , a constable (in sense 1), Old French conestable , French connétable , Late Latin conestabulus , constabularius , comes stabuli , orig., count of the stable, master...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/143

constable

a British policeman appointed by the parish to keep the peace. Later incorporated into London's paid police force.
Found on http://charlesdickenspage.com/glossary.html

Constable

A constable was an officer of high rank in several of the mediaeval monarchies. Among the Franks, after the major domus, or mayor of the palace, had become king, the comes stabuli became the first dignitary of the crown, commander-in-chief of the armies, and highest judge in military affairs. The connetable, however, acquired so much power that Lou...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/CXCA.HTM

Constable

A peace officer for a particular geographic area -- most often a rural county -- who commonly has the power to serve legal papers, arrest lawbreakers, and keep the peace. Depending on the state, a constable may be similar to a marshal or sheriff.
Found on http://www.nolo.com/dictionary/constable-term.html

Constable

An officer, generally elected by the people, who possesses power as a conservator of the peace at common law, and by virtue of various legislative enactments.
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def/c289.htm

Constable

An old position originally responsible to the Manor Court Leet. The parish constable, otherwise known as Petty Constable, would enforce various orders from the Church Wardens and Overseers of the Poor. He would be responsible for all sorts of tasks, ale houses, beggars, bastardy payments, church and poor rate collection, maintenance of pillories an...
Found on http://www.mdlp.co.uk/genweb/glossary.htm

constable

constable Related word families intertwined with 'to place, placing, to put; to add; to stay; to attach' word units: fix-; pon-; prosth-; the-, thes-.
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2026/3

constable

Low-ranking British police officer. In medieval Europe, a constable was an officer of the king, originally responsible for army stores and stabling, and later responsible for the army in the...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Constable

Officer appointed in each parish to make arrests and uphold law and order.
Found on http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/static/Glossary.jsp

constable

officer of state in western European countries from medieval times and also of certain executive legal officials in Great Britain and the United ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/131

constable

officer, peace-officer, from Latin comes stabuli,
Found on http://info.sjc.ox.ac.uk/forests/glossary.htm

constable

officer, peace-officer, from Latin comes stabuli,
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22223

Constable

official in charge of castle in owner's absence
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20402

Constable

official in charge of castle in owner's absence
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22129

Constable

title of governor of the castle: also warden, captain, castellan
Found on http://www.castles-of-britain.com/glossary.htm

constable

[n] - English landscape painter (1776-1837) 2. [n] - (British) a police officer of the lowest rank 3. [n] - a lawman with less authority and jurisdiction than a sheriff
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=constable
No exact match found