Contrapposto

Contrapposto is an Italian term that means counterpose. It is used in the visual arts to describe a human figure standing with most of its weight on one foot so that its shoulders and arms twist off-axis from the hips and legs. This gives the figure a more dynamic, or alternatively relaxed appearance. It can also be used to refer to multiple figur...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contrapposto

contrapposto

(Italian: `opposite`), in the visual arts, a sculptural scheme, originated by the ancient Greeks, in which the standing human figure is poised such ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/135

contrapposto

In the visual arts, a pose in which one part of the body twists away from another part, the weight of the body being balanced on one leg rather than two. First achieved in Greek sculpture of the 6th...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Contrapposto

It is an Italian art term describing a pose in which the human body is twisted so that the chest and shoulders face one direction, balanced by the hips and legs facing another. The term was coined during the Renaissance, but Greek sculptors used the pose in the 5th century BC to make the figure more emotionally expressive.
Found on http://www.latinart.com/glossary.cfm?sort=C

contrapposto

Italian for "counterpoise." The counterpositioning of parts of the human figure about a central vertical axis, as when the weight is placed on one foot, causing the hip and shoulder lines to counterbalance each other, often in a graceful S-curve.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21532

Contrapposto

Italian word for "set against." Method developed by the Greeks to represent freedom of movement in a figure. Parts of the body are placed asymmetrically in opposition to each other around a central axis
Found on http://www.selectartusa.com/gloss.htm

contrapposto

Literally, `counterpoise.” A method of portraying the human figure, especially in sculpture, often achieved by placing the weight on one foot and turning the shoulder so the figure appears relaxed and mobile. The result is often a graceful S-curve.
Found on http://www.modernsculpture.com/glossary.htm
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