Bossage

Bossage is uncut stone that is laid in place in a building, projecting outward from the building, to later be carved into decorative moldings, capitals, arms, etc. Bossages are also rustic work, consisting of stones which seem to advance beyond the surface of the building, by reason of indentures, or channels left in the joinings; used chiefly in ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bossage

Bossage

• (n.) Rustic work, consisting of stones which seem to advance beyond the level of the building, by reason of indentures or channels left in the joinings. • (n.) A stone in a building, left rough and projecting, to be afterward carved into shape.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/bossage/

Bossage

Boss'age noun [ French bossage , from bosse . See Boss a stud.] 1. (Architecture) A stone in a building, left rough and projecting, to be afterward carved into shape. Gwilt. 2. (Architecture) Rustic work, consisting of stones which seem to adv...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/82

Bossage

A rough stone placed in a wall and projecting from it, that is left to be sculptured at a later time. Or, coursed stone ashlar with roughly dressed or projecting face.
Found on http://www.selectstone.com/architectural-resources/stone-glossary/

Bossage

In architecture, bossage describes a stone in a building, left rough and projecting, to be afterward carved into shape. The term is also applied to Rustic work, consisting of stones which seem to advance beyond the level of the building, by reason of indentures or channels left in the joinings.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TB.HTM

Bossage

uncut stone that is laid in place in a building, projecting outward from the building, to later be carved into decorative moldings, capitals, arms, etc. Bossages are also rustic work, consisting of stones which seem to advance beyond the surface of the building, by reason of indentures, or channels left in the joinings; used chiefly in the corners ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_architecture
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