Blackmail

Making an unwarranted demand with menaces. (Crimes against property)

Blackmail

Blackmail is an act, often a crime, involving unjustified threats to make a gain or cause loss to another unless a demand is met. It may be defined as coercion involving threats of physical harm, threat of criminal prosecution, or threats for the purposes of taking the person`s money or property. It is the name of a statutory offence in the Unite....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackmail

Blackmail

• (n.) Payment of money exacted by means of intimidation; also, extortion of money from a person by threats of public accusation, exposure, or censure. • (n.) Black rent, or rent paid in corn, flesh, or the lowest coin, a opposed to `white rent`, which paid in silver. • (v. t.) To extort money from by exciting fears of injury other t...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/blackmail/

Blackmail

(from the article `Allgood, Sara`) Allgood`s film debut took place in the first British talkie, Blackmail (1929), and her other English-made films include The Passing of the Third ... Montage may also be applied to the combination of sounds for artistic expression. Dialogue, music, and sound effects may be combined in complex ... ......
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/75

Blackmail

(n) Blackmail is method of influencing a person by resorting or threatening to do harm to a connected person or property so as to compel him to do or not to do certain acts which he would not have done without such compulsion. Eg. Kidnapping for ransom.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

blackmail

noun extortion of money by threats to divulge discrediting information
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Blackmail

Black'mail` noun [ Black + mail a piece of money.] 1. A certain rate of money, corn, cattle, or other thing, anciently paid, in the north of England and south of Scotland, to certain men who were allied to robbers, or moss troopers, to be by them protected from pillage. Sir W. S...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/61

Blackmail

A criminal act of extortion, malicious threatening to do injury to another to compel him to do an act against his will. Usually involves the threat to release information, often true, about the person that will defame his reputation or bring criminal actions against him.
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def/b105.htm

Blackmail

An unjustified demand, threatening to reveal embarrassing, disgraceful, or damaging facts (or rumors) about a person to the public, family, spouse, or associates unless paid off to not carry out the threat. Blackmail is charged under the crime of extortion.
Found on http://www.nolo.com/dictionary/blackmail-term.html

blackmail

blackmail, in law, exaction of money from another by threat of exposure of criminal action or of disreputable conduct. The term was originally used for the tribute levied until the 18th cent. upon the inhabitants of the Scottish border to provide immunity from raids by Scottish bands. Statutes often...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0807788.html

blackmail

Criminal offence of extorting money with menaces or threats of detrimental action, such as exposure of some misconduct on the part of the victim. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

blackmail

Criminal offence of extorting money with menaces or threats of detrimental action, such as exposure of some misconduct on the part of the victim
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0017937.html

blackmail

[n] - extortion of money by threats to divulge discrediting information 2. [v] - exert pressure on someone through threats 3. [v] - obtain through threats
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=blackmail
No exact match found