armiger

  1. a squire carrying the armor of a knight
  2. a nobleman entitled to bear heraldic arms

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armiger

A weapon bearer or armed man.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

armiger

Latin, meaning: arms-bearer
Found on http://archives.nd.edu/aaa.htm

armiger

[n] - a squire carrying the armor of a knight 2. [n] - a nobleman entitled to bear heraldic arms
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=armiger

Armiger

'Weaponbearer'. armed man.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20764

Armiger

Ar'mi·ger noun [ Latin armiger armor bearer; arma arms + gerere to bear.] Formerly, an armor bearer, as of a knight, an esquire who bore his shield and rendered other services. In later use, one next in degree to a knight, and entitled to armorial bearings. The term is now supersede...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/121

armiger

noun a squire carrying the armor of a knight
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Armiger

• (n.) Formerly, an armor bearer, as of a knight, an esquire who bore his shield and rendered other services. In later use, one next in degree to a knight, and entitled to armorial bearings. The term is now superseded by esquire.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/armiger/

Armiger

In heraldry, an armiger is one who is entitled to a coat of arms.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/UA.HTM

Armiger

In heraldry, an armiger is a person entitled to use a coat of arms (e.g., bear Arms, an `Armour-Bearer`) either by hereditary right, grant, matriculation, or assumption of arms. Such a person is said to be armigerous. ==Etymology== The Latin word armiger literally means `arms-bearer`. In high and late medieval England, the word referred to an ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armiger
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