Anagram

An anagram is a type of word play, the result of rearranging the letters of a word or phrase to produce a new word or phrase, using all the original letters exactly once; for example Doctor Who can be rearranged into Torchwood. Someone who creates anagrams may be called an `anagrammatist`. The original word or phrase is known as the subject of t.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anagram

Anagram

• (n.) Literally, the letters of a word read backwards, but in its usual wider sense, the change or one word or phrase into another by the transposition of its letters. Thus Galenus becomes angelus; William Noy (attorney-general to Charles I., and a laborious man) may be turned into I moyl in law. • (v. t.) To anagrammatize.Anagram: words...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/anagram/

Anagram

(Greekwriting back or anew)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

anagram

noun a word or phrase spelled by rearranging the letters of another word or phrase
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Anagram

An'a·gram noun [ French anagramme , Late Latin anagramma , from Greek ... back, again + ... to write. See Graphic .] Literally, the letters of a word read backwards, but in its usual wider sense, the change or one word or phrase into another by the transposition of its letters. Thus...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/76

Anagram

An'a·gram transitive verb To anagrammatize. « Some of these anagramed his name, Benlowes, into Benevolus. Warburton. »
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/76

anagram

a word spelled out by rearranging the letters of another word. When both lexical forms appear in the same poem, especially in proximity, a reader may reasonably suspect that the anagram is a figure of speech. If only one form occurs, the encoding of an association is harder to prove. For example, 'the teacher gapes at the mounds of exam pages lying...
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

Anagram

A word spelled out by rearranging the letters of another word. When both lexical forms appear in the
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429

anagram

anagram 1. A transposition of the letters of a word, name, or phrase, whereby a new word or phrase is formed. 2. A word or phrase that contains all the letters of another word or phrase in a different order; for example, 'no more stars' is an anagram of 'astronomers'. The word 'now' is an anagram of 'wo' and 'dread' is an anagram of 'adder' (or vic...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2745/

anagram

anagram [Gr.,=something read backward], rearrangement of the letters of a word or words to make another word or other words. A famous Latin anagram was an answer made out of a question asked by Pilate. The question was Quid est veritas? [What is truth?], and the answer Est vir qui adest [it is the m...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0803854.html

anagram

The rearrangement of the letters of a word or phrase into another word or phrase, using all the letters once and only once. The best anagrams are meaningful and relate in some way to the original subject; for example, 'stone age' and 'stage one.' There are also many remarkable examples of long anagr...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/A/anagram.html

anagram

the transposing of the letters of a word or group of words to produce other words that possess meaning, preferably bearing some logical relation to ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/67

Anagram

The transposition of letters from a word or phrase to form a new word or phrase. All schoolboys know that T.S.Eliot = toilets.
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

anagram

[n] - a word or phrase spelled by rearranging the letters of another word or phrase 2. [v] - read letters out of order to discover a hidden meaning
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=anagram
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