Akkad

[city] Akkad (also spelled Akkade or Agade) was the capital of the Akkadian Empire, which was the dominant political force in Mesopotamia at the end of the third millennium BCE. The existence of Akkad is known only from textual sources; its location has not yet been identified, although scholars have proposed a number of different sites. Mo...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akkad_(city)

Akkad

Akkad (ă'kăd, ä'käd) , ancient region of Mesopotamia, occupying the northern part of later Babylonia. The southern part was Sumer. In both regions city-states had begun to appear in the 4th millennium B.C. In Akkad a Semitic language, Akkadian, was spoken. Akkad flouris...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/history/A0802950.html

Akkad

ancient region in what is now central Iraq. Akkad was the northern (or northwestern) division of ancient Babylonian civilization. The region was ... [12 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/36

Akkad

Northern Semitic people who conquered the Sumerians 2350 BC and ruled Mesopotamia. Their language was Semitic (old Akkadian). Akkad...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Akkad

Northern Semitic people who conquered the Sumerians 2350 BC and ruled Mesopotamia. Their language was Semitic (old Akkadian). Akkad was also the northern of the two provinces into which Babylonia was divided. The ancient city of Akkad in central Mesopotamia, founded by Sargon I, was an imperial centre in the late third millennium BC; the site i...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0002822.html
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