Yoke

A yoke is a wooden beam normally used between a pair of oxen or other animals to enable them to pull together on a load when working in pairs, as oxen usually do; some yokes are fitted to individual animals. There are several types of yoke, used in different cultures, and for different types of oxen. A pair of oxen may be called a yoke of oxen, an...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoke

Yoke

• (n.) A clamp or similar piece that embraces two other parts to hold or unite them in their respective or relative positions, as a strap connecting a slide valve to the valve stem, or the soft iron block or bar permanently connecting the pole pieces of an electromagnet, as in a dynamo. • (n.) A bent crosspiece connecting two other parts....
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/yoke/

yoke

<microscopy> The assembly of electromagnetic coils that are placed over the camera tube or the neck of a picture tube or a cathode-ray tube of the magnetic focusing type. The focusing coil in the yoke controls the convergence of the electron beam. The H- and V-deflection coils deflect the electron beam so that it sweeps the target or phosphor...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

yoke

(yōk) a connecting structure. jugum.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

yoke

noun stable gear that joins two draft animals at the neck so they can work together as a team
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Yoke

[aeronautics] A yoke, alternatively known as a control column, is a device used for piloting some fixed-wing aircraft. The pilot uses the yoke to control the attitude of the plane, usually in both pitch and roll. Rotating the control wheel controls the ailerons and the roll axis. Fore and aft movement of the control column controls the elev...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoke_(aeronautics)

Yoke

[clothing] A yoke is a shaped pattern piece which forms part of a garment, usually fitting around the neck and shoulders, or around the hips to provide support for looser parts of the garment, such as a gathered skirt or the body of a shirt. Yoke construction was first seen in the 19th century. Bodice yokes were first seen in the 1880s, whi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoke_(clothing)

Yoke

[diving regulator] Velasco Hall of DLSU-Manila. Self-taken ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoke_(diving_regulator)

Yoke

[Lake District] Yoke is a fell in the Lake District in Cumbria, England. It has a height of 706 m (2,316 ft) and is situated in the far eastern sector of the national park, 7 kilometres north east of the town of Ambleside. Yoke is the southern extremity of the long ridge that runs southwards from the fell of High Street. Yoke’s name is be...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoke_(Lake_District)

Yoke

[unit of measurement] A yoke was a unit of land measurement used in Kent in England at the time of the Domesday Book for tax purposes. It was equal to a quarter of a sulung. A sulung was the amount of land which could be ploughed by 4 ox-pairs (or approximately 2 hides), therefore a yoke was a pair of oxen, representing the amount of land t...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoke_(unit_of_measurement)

Yoke

Yoke (yōk) noun [ Middle English yok , ʒoc , Anglo-Saxon geoc ; akin to Dutch juk , Old High German joh , German joch , Icelandic & Swedish ok , Danish aag , Goth. juk , Lithuanian jungas , Russian igo , La...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/Y/6

Yoke

Yoke intransitive verb To be joined or associated; to be intimately connected; to consort closely; to mate. « We 'll yoke together, like a double shadow.» Shak.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/Y/6

Yoke

Yoke noun (Chiefly Mach.) A clamp or similar piece that embraces two other parts to hold or unite them in their respective or relative positions, as a strap connecting a slide valve to the valve stem, or the soft iron block or bar permanently connecting the pole pieces of an electromagnet, as in a d...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/Y/6

Yoke

Yoke transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Yoked ; present participle & verbal noun Yoking .] 1. To put a yoke on; to join in or with a yoke; as, to yoke oxen, or pair of oxen. 2. To couple; to join with a...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/Y/6

Yoke

A crossbar in the form of two S-curves used for the top rail of chair back.
Found on http://www.artisansofthevalley.com/comm_gloss3.html

Yoke

A fitted area of fabric along the front and back of the shoulders or at the top of a skirt.
Found on https://www.popxo.com/2014/10/your-a-z-guide-to-fashion-terms-whose-meaning

yoke

a fixed ferromagnetic part, usually not surrounded by a winding, whose principal purpose is to complete the main magnetic circuit
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=811-26-30

Yoke

A frame on which a pair of load carrying (trolley) wheel assemblies are mounted.
Found on http://www.mhia.org/learning/glossary/y

yoke

a part of a magnetic circuit, the main function of which is to provide a low reluctance path for the magnetic flux
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=221-04-32

Yoke

Ancient Measurement Terms: A measurement of land in Kent equal to one quarter of a sulong.
Found on http://www.hemyockcastle.co.uk/measure.htm

yoke

another name for a pair. The yoke is used in describing teams of animals, especially oxen, used to pull plows or wagons.
Found on http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/dictY.html

yoke

any unspecified object.
Found on http://www.thecraic.net/glossary.html

yoke

become joined or linked together
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/161539

Yoke

In architecture, a yoke is a tie securing two timbers together, not for part of a regular truss, but rather serving a temporary purpose to provide against unusual strain.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TY.HTM

Yoke

In costume, a yoke is an integral portion of a smock, forming the upper part of the garment, usually fitted across the bust and around the back between the shoulders, it is pleated, gathered or plain and supports the rest of the garment. The term also applies to an oversized waistband of a skirt from which the rest of the skirt hangs.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/PY.HTM
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