Terrace

An embankment or channel built across a slope, approximately on the contour, to prevent water off-run.

terrace

  1. usually paved outdoor area adjoining a residence
  2. a level shelf of land interrupting a declivity (with steep slopes above and below)

terrace

(from the article `beach`) ...tide height, and sediment composition and distribution. The following, however, constitute some of the profile elements that commonly occur. At ... Most striking scenically are the coasts with Holocene terraces undergoing tectonic uplift. Terraces of this sort, backed in successive steps by ... ...about ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/28

terrace

[n] - a level shelf of land interrupting a declivity (with steep slopes above and below) 2. [n] - (British) a row of houses built in a similar style and having common dividing walls (or the street on which they face) 3. [v] - provide with a terrace, as of a house 4. [v] - make into terraces as for cultivation
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=terrace

Terrace

• (v.) A balcony, especially a large and uncovered one. • (v. t.) To form into a terrace or terraces; to furnish with a terrace or terraces, as, to terrace a garden, or a building. • (v.) A flat roof to a house; as, the buildings of the Oriental nations are covered with terraces. • (v.) A street, or a row of houses, on a bank or...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/terrace/

terrace

noun a row of houses built in a similar style and having common dividing walls (or the street on which they face); `Grosvenor Terrace`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Terrace

[agriculture] In agriculture, a terrace is a piece of sloped plane that has been cut into a series of successively receding flat surfaces or platforms, which resemble steps, for the purposes of more effective farming. This type of landscaping, therefore, is called terracing. Graduated terrace steps are commonly used to farm on hilly or moun...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terrace_(agriculture)

Terrace

[building] A terrace as an architectural term is an external, raised, open, flat area in either a landscape (such as a park or garden), around a building, or as a roof terrace on a flat roof. ==Ground terraces== Terraces are used primarily for leisure activity such as sitting, strolling, resting, or sports, growing plants in pots, reflectin...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terrace_(building)

Terrace

[geology] In geology, a terrace is a step-like landform. A terrace consists of a flat or gently sloping geomorphic surface, called a tread, that is typically bounded one side by a steeper ascending slope, which is called a `riser` or `scarp.` The tread and the steeper descending slope (riser or scarp) together constitute the terrace. Terrac...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terrace_(geology)

Terrace

Ter'race noun [ French terrasse (cf. Spanish terraza , Italian terrazza ), from Latin terra the earth, probably for tersa , originally meaning, dry land, and akin to torrere to parch, English torrid , and thirst . See Thirst , and confe...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/30

Terrace

Ter'race transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Terraced ; present participle & verbal noun Terracing .] To form into a terrace or terraces; to furnish with a terrace or terraces, as, to terrace a garden, or a building. S...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/30

terrace

1. A raised level space, shelf, or platform of earth, supported on one or more sides by a wall, a bank of tuft, or the like, whether designed for use or pleasure. ... 2. A balcony, especially a large and uncovered one. ... 3. A flat roof to a house; as, the buildings of the Oriental nations are covered with terraces. ... 4. A street, or a row of ho...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Terrace

a flat paved area next to the house, usually raised above the level of the garden below, down to which one descends via sets of steps. A terrace acts as an interface between the house and the garden.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20935

Terrace

A horizontal or nearly horizontal natural or artificial topographic feature interrupting a steeper slop, sometimes occurring in a series.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20127

Terrace

A nearly level surface bordering a steeper slope, such as a stream terrace or wave-cut terrace.
Found on http://www.evcforum.net/WebPages/Glossary_Geology.html

Terrace

a series of flat platforms of soil on the side of a hill, rising one above the other.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20003

Terrace

a standing area of a stadium, consisting of a series of concrete steps which are erected for spectators to stand on. Often occupied by ultras. Terraces have been phased out in some countries, over safety concerns.[259]
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_association_football_terms

TERRACE

An abandoned flood plain formed when a stream flowed at a level above the level of its present channel and flood plain.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22047

Terrace

An elevated surface above the existing level of a floodplain or shore that is created by stream or ocean wave erosion.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/t.html

Terrace

An embankment, ridge, or leveled strip constructed across sloping soils on the contour, or at right
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22399

Terrace

An outdoor extension of a building, situated above the ground level, and open to the sky. See patio.
Found on http://www.architecturaltrust.org/outreach/education/glossary-of-architectu

Terrace

In architecture, a terrace is a raised space or platform adjoining to a building, frequently encompassed with a balustrade or steps, as at Versailles, where there are a succession of terraces one above the other. A level area on the side of a sloping bank or other situation overlooking lower scenery in a garden, pleasure ground, etc. Terraces were ...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TT.HTM

Terrace

In geology, a terrace is a level plain, usually with a steep front, bordering a river, a lake, or sometimes the sea. Many rivers are bordered by a series of terraces at different levels, indicating the flood plains at successive periods in their history.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/HT.HTM

terrace

make into level shelfs of land interrupting a declivity
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/724733

Terrace

Open area connected to building; usually paved
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22203
No exact match found