slander

impugning a person's character or morality by spoken words or writing (the strict modern distinction between verbal slander and written libel was only beginning to emerge during the early modern period). To be actionable in law the slander had to allege activities that could, if true, lead to prosecution by a secular or *ecclesiastical court. The ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21814

Slander

• (n.) Disgrace; reproach; dishonor; opprobrium. • (v. t.) To defame; to injure by maliciously uttering a false report; to tarnish or impair the reputation of by false tales maliciously told or propagated; to calumniate. • (n.) A false tale or report maliciously uttered, tending to injure the reputation of another; the malicious utte...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/slander/

slander

(from the article `defamation`) Libel and slander are the legal subcategories of defamation. Generally libel is defamation in print, pictures, or any other visual symbols. Slander ... ...numerous complicated defenses also make sure that free speech is not totally throttled. But in the main the English law of defamation is complex ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/107

Slander

(n)Slander is an act of defemating a person by oral assertion of untrue statement with an intention to hurt his reputation and honor. It is a civil wrong and a slanderer is liable for damages.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

slander

noun words falsely spoken that damage the reputation of another
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Slander

Slan'der noun [ Middle English sclandere , Old French esclandre , esclandle , escandre , French esclandre , from Latin scandalum , Greek ......... a snare, stumbling block, offense, scandal; probably originally, the spring of a trap, and akin to Sanskrit s...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/117

Slander

Slan'der transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Slandered ; present participle & verbal noun Slandering .] 1. To defame; to injure by maliciously uttering a false report; to tarnish or impair the reputation of by false tales...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/117

slander

An older term for the spoken form of defamation. Compare with libel.
Found on http://www.thenewsmanual.net/Resources/glossary.html

Slander

An untruthful oral (spoken) statement about a person that harms the person's reputation or standing in the community. Because slander is a tort (a civil wrong), the injured person can bring a lawsuit against the person who made the false statement. If the statement is made via broadcast media -- for example, over the radio or on TV -- it is conside...
Found on http://www.nolo.com/dictionary/slander-term.html

Slander

False and defamatory spoken words tending to harm another
Found on http://jec.unm.edu/manuals-resources/glossary-of-legal-terms

slander

False and defamatory spoken words tending to harm another's reputation, business or means of livelihood. Compare libel.
Found on http://www.pacourts.us/learn/legal-glossary

Slander

False defamation expressed as spoken words, signs or gestures, which cause damage to the character o
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22403

slander

n. oral defamation, in which someone tells one or more persons an untruth about another, which untruth will harm the reputation of the person defamed. Slander is a civil wrong (tort) and can be the basis for a lawsuit. Damages (payoff for worth) for slander may be limited to actual (special) damages unless there is malicious intent, since such dama...
Found on http://dictionary.law.com/Default.xhtml?selected=1969

slander

slander: see libel and slander.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0918821.html

slander

Spoken defamatory statement; if written, or broadcast on radio or television, it constitutes libel. In the UK slanders are generally actionable only if pecuniary loss has been suffered, except...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

slander

Spoken defamatory statement; if written, or broadcast on radio or television, it constitutes libel
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0005286.html

SLANDER

Spoken words which have a damaging effect on a person's reputation
Found on http://www.hmcourts-service.gov.uk/infoabout/glossary/legal.htm

slander

words falsely spoken that damage the reputation of another
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/1897727

slander

[n] - words falsely spoken that damage the reputation of another
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=slander
No exact match found