Range

A measure of spread in statistics; the difference between the greatest and the least in a set of numerical data.

Range

In a radio frequency system, range is defined as the maximum allowable distance between the antenna and the tag.

Range

A large area of natural pasture land, or in statistics the range of a set of n measurements x1, x2, x3, ..., xn is the difference between the largest and smallest measurement. Of a pest, the geographical region or regions in which it is known to occur.

Range

The zone in which a voice sings, i.e., soprano range, mezzo soprano range, tenor range, etc.
Found on http://www.greensboroopera.org/oft-education.shtml

Range

The lowest to highest notes an individual voice can produce, or the lowest to highest notes a particular score requires of a singer.
Found on http://app1.kuhf.org/articles/15790-Opera-Glossary.html

Range

The natural distribution of a species, including migratory pathways and seasonal haunts.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21699

Range

Nominal operating limits, specified by the lowest calibration point to the highest calibration point.
Found on http://www.youngco.com/young2.asp?ID=4&Type=3

Range

A fixed distance between two points, such as between a starting and an ending waypoint or a satellite and a GPS reciever.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20041

Range

The high and low prices, or high and low bids and offers recorded during a specified time.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20047

Range

Geographical area in which an animal can be found.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20085

Range

Is the difference between the high and the low for a time series for a stated period. For example, it can refer to the daily, weekly, monthly, yearly or lifetime range in prices, interest rates or other economic indicator.
Found on http://www.oasismanagement.com/glossary/

range

Of a plant pathogen: The geographical region or regions in which it is known to occur.
Found on http://ppathw3.cals.cornell.edu/glossary/Defs_R.htm

Range

The range of a sample (or a data set) is a measure of the spread or the dispersion of the observations. It is the difference between the largest and the smallest observed value of some quantitative characteristic and is very easy to calculate
Found on http://www.bized.co.uk/reference/glossary/index.htm?glosid=1297

range

[Noun] A number of scores on a scale which go from the highest to the lowest point. Or it can mean a series of things.
Example: The average weight range is between 60 and 70 kilograms. The shop stocked a large range of cookery books.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

Range

Distance between the lowest and highest tones of a melody, an instrument or a voice.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio2/soldonsong/glossary/r.shtml

Range

The maximum and minimum allowable full-scale signal (input or output).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20158

Range

The difference between the highest and lowest prices recorded during a given trading session, week, month, year etc.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20174

Range

The difference between the highest and lowest price of a future recorded during a given trading session.
Found on http://www.exchange-handbook.co.uk/index.cfm?section=glossary&first_letter=

range

[n] - the limits of the values a function can take 2. [n] - a series of hills or mountains 3. [n] - a large tract of grassy open land on which livestock can graze 4. [n] - the limits within which something can be effective 5. [n] - a variety of different things or activities 6. [n] - a place for shooting (firing or drivin...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=range

Range

The difference between the maximum and minimum values in a sample or population.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20429

Range

Block of buildings.
Found on http://www.digital-documents.co.uk/archi/gloschur.htm

Range

The range of a variable means either the set of allowable values; or the set of values actually occurring, observed, or calculated.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20541

Range

Refers to the maximum allowable full-scale input or output signal for a specified performance
Found on http://www.amplicon.co.uk/info/glossary.cfm

Range

The amount of notes an instrument or voice can produce. The higher the range, the more notes can be produced.
Found on http://www.philharmonia.co.uk/thesoundexchange/projects/glossary/glossary.h

Range

The range of a sample (or a data set) is a measure of the spread or the dispersion of the observations. It is the difference between the largest and the smallest observed value of some quantitative characteristic.
Found on http://www.cirem.co.uk/definitions.html
No exact match found