range

(Learning Modules / Mathematics / Modelling projectiles) Maximum horizontal displacement.

Range

A measure of variability indicating the difference between the highest and lowest values in a distribution of scores
Found on http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/information/glossary/

Range

(also 'driving range, practice range, practice tee') an area, separate from the golf course, designa
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Entertainment/Golf/

range

(from the article `analysis`) A simple measure of variability is the range, given as the difference between the largest and the smallest results. It has no statistical ... The range, the difference between the largest value and the smallest value, is the simplest measure of variability in the data. The range is ... [2 related article...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/11

range

(from the article `artillery`) ...so as to distribute the load evenly onto a railway track. The most impressive railway gun built during the war was the German 210-millimetre ... The mortar declined in importance during the 19th century but was restored by World War I, when short-range, high-trajectory weapons were developed ... ...f...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/11

range

(from the article `central-place theory`) ...the smallest market area necessary for the goods and services to be economically viable. Once a threshold has been established, the central place ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/11

range

(from the article `radar`) ...are not of interest might be echoes from the ground or rain, which can mask and interfere with the detection of the desired echo from the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/11

range

(rānj) the difference between the upper and lower limits of a variable or of a series of values. an interval in which values sampled from a population, or the values in the population itself, are known to lie. range of accommodation the total amount of accommodative pow...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

range

[n] - the limits of the values a function can take 2. [n] - a series of hills or mountains 3. [n] - a large tract of grassy open land on which livestock can graze 4. [n] - the limits within which something can be effective 5. [n] - a variety of different things or activities 6. [n] - a place for shooting (firing or drivin...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=range

Range

• (v.) An aggregate of individuals in one rank or degree; an order; a class. • (v.) The horizontal distance to which a shot or other projectile is carried. • (v. i.) To be placed in order; to be ranked; to admit of arrangement or classification; to rank. • (v.) A series of things in a line; a row; a rank; as, a range of building...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/range/

range

noun the limits within which something can be effective; `range of motion`; `he was beyond the reach of their fire`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

range

noun a place for shooting (firing or driving) projectiles of various kinds; `the army maintains a missile range in the desert`; `any good golf club will have a range where you can practice`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

range

(statistics) In statistics, a measure of dispersion in a frequency distribution, equalling the difference between the largest and smallest values of the variable. The range is sensitive to extreme values in the sense that it will give a distorted picture of the dispersion if one measurement is...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0036067.html

Range

[biology] In biology, the range or distribution of a species is the geographical area within which that species can be found. Within that range, dispersion is variation in local density. The term is often qualified: There are at least five types of distribution patterns: ==Bird wildlife corridors== One common example of bird species` ranges...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Range_(biology)

Range

[geographic] Range, a geographic term referring to a chain of hills or mountains; a somewhat linear, complex mountainous or hilly area. ==See Also== ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Range_(geographic)

Range

[mathematics] In mathematics, the range of a function refers to either the codomain or the image of the function, depending upon usage. Modern usage almost always uses range to mean image. The word range may eventually become obsolete. The codomain of a function is some arbitrary set. In real analysis it is the real numbers. In complex anal...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Range_(mathematics)

Range

[music] In music, the range of a musical instrument is the distance from the lowest to the highest pitch it can play. For a singing voice, the equivalent is vocal range. The range of a musical part is the distance between its lowest and highest note. The terms sounding range, written range, designated range, duration range and dynamic range...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Range_(music)

range

[Noun] A number of scores on a scale which go from the highest to the lowest point. Or it can mean a series of things.
Example: The average weight range is between 60 and 70 kilograms. The shop stocked a large range of cookery books.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

Range

[particle radiation] In passing through matter, charged particles ionize and thus lose energy in many steps, until their energy is (almost) zero. The distance to this point is called the range of the particle. The range depends on the type of particle, on its initial energy and on the material through which it passes. For example, if the io...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Range_(particle_radiation)

Range

[statistics] In arithmetic, the range of a set of data is the difference between the largest and smallest values. However, in descriptive statistics, this concept of range has a more complex meaning. The range is the size of the smallest interval which contains all the data and provides an indication of statistical dispersion. It is measure...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Range_(statistics)

Range

Range (rānj) transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Ranged (rānjd); present participle & verbal noun Ranging (rān'jĭng).] [ Middle English rengen , Old French rengier , French ranger
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/10

Range

Range intransitive verb 1. To rove at large; to wander without restraint or direction; to roam. « Like a ranging spaniel that barks at every bird he sees.» Burton. 2. To have range; to change or differ within limits; to be capable of projecting, or to admit ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/10

Range

Range noun [ From Range , v. : confer French rangĂ©e .] 1. A series of things in a line; a row; a rank; as, a range of buildings; a range of mountains. 2. An aggregate of individuals in one rank or degree; an order; a class. «...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/10

Range

1. A measure of the difference between the highest and lowest variates. 2. A strip of land six miles
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Business/Real_Estate/

Range

A charged particle traversing a medium loses energy in collisions with atomic electrons. The range is the distance the charged particle travels before coming to rest in the medium. A measurement of the range may be used to give the energy of the incident particle.
Found on http://www-bdnew.fnal.gov/operations/accgloss/gloss.html
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