plate

A term for articles made of gold or silver for ceremonial use - particularly in church - or for domestic purposes. Not to be confused with silver or gold-plated wares such as sheffield plate and electroplate.

Plate

See Corner Plate.

Plate

Plate (shortened from plate of ham) is slang for to perform fellatio.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZP.HTM

plate

n. Rigid parts of the Earth's crust and part of the Earth's upper mantle that move and adjoin each other along zones of seismic activity. The theory that the crust and part of the mantle are divided into plates that interact with each other causing seismic and tecotnic activity is called plate tectonics.
Found on http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/glossary_2.html

Plate

Major section of the earth's crust, bounded by such features as mid-ocean ridges
Found on http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/marinebio/glossary.opq.html

Plate

(i) An image printed separately from the text, often on different or higher quality paper. (ii) The printing plate from which an image is produced.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20208

plate

[n] - the quantity contained in a plate 2. [n] - a rigid layer of the lithosphere that is believed to drift slowly 3. [n] - the thin under portion of the forequarter 4. [n] - a main course served on a plate 5. [n] - any flat platelike body structure or part 6. [n] - the positively charged electrode in a vacuum tube 7. [n]...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=plate

Plate

1) A type of reverb device where a large metal sheet is suspended on spring clips and driven like a speaker cone.
2) An electrode in a tube that receives the electrons.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20447

Plate

A panel of brass or (in more recent times) nickel, pierced with a number of holes to receive the pivots of a watch's moving parts.   Until the late 1700s there were two plates, separated by pillars, and most of the movement was sandwiched between them;  then came the Lépine calibre which led directl
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20450

Plate

Piece of paper, metal, plastic or rubber carrying an image to be reproduced using a printing press.
Found on http://www.tso.co.uk/solutions/publishingsolutions/printproduction/printglo

Plate

See also ILLUSTRATED BOOK (283), ILLUSTRATION (284) An illustration in a book, printed separately from the text often on a special paper
Found on http://www.ifla.org/VII/s30/pub/mg1.htm#5

Plate

A length of timber or steel placed either on top of a wall to support the roof trusses (a wall plate) or fixed to a floor so that studs or a timber-framed partition can be installed (a floor plate).
Found on http://www.selfbuildabc.co.uk/self-build-glossary.html

Plate

A length of timber or steel placed either on top of a wall to support the roof trusses (a wall plate) or fixed to a floor so that studs or a timber-framed partition can be installed (a floor plate).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20704

Plate

1. One of about fifteen rigid sections of the Earth's surface; a section of the Earth's surface bordered by seismic activity (earthquakes and volcanoes). 2. Pieces of calcium carbonate forming the outer shell of some marine creatures, for example echinoids
Found on http://www.sedgwickmuseum.org/education/glossary.html

Plate

Radio valve (or tube) component, more commonly referred to as anode (US).
Found on http://www.mhs.ox.ac.uk/marconi/collection/glossary.php

Plate

A term used pre-1743 to describe all articles of solid silver and gold. Derived from the Spanish word plata for silver, the term correctly describes all early solid silver but is often mistakenly used to refer to Old Sheffield or electroplate.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20826

Plate

Brief for printing plate, generally a thin sheet of metal that carries the printing image. The plate surface is treated or configured so that only the printing image is ink receptive.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20829

Plate

Sill plate: a horizontal member anchored to a masonry wall. Sole plate: bottom horizontal member of a frame wall. Top plate: top horizontal member of a frame wall supporting ceiling joists, rafters, or other members.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20933

Plate

a general term for any horizontal timber supporting the ends of joist, rafters etc. More specifically, the term is usually taken to refer to a horizontal timber at the bottom of a timber framed wall (the sole or sill plate) or at the top (the wall plate).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20935

Plate

Plate noun [ Old French plate a plate of metal, a cuirsas, French plat a plate, a shallow vessel of silver, other metal, or earth, from plat flat, Greek .... See Place , noun ] 1. A flat, or nearly flat, piece of metal, the thickness of which...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/102

Plate

Plate transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Plated ; present participle & verbal noun Plating .] 1. To cover or overlay with gold, silver, or other metals, either by a mechanical process, as hammering, or by a chemical proc...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/102

plate

1. A flat, or nearly flat, piece of metal, the thickness of which is small in comparison with the other dimensions; a thick sheet of metal; as, a steel plate. ... 2. Metallic armor composed of broad pieces. 'Mangled . . . Through plate and mail.' (Milton) ... 3. Domestic vessels and utensils, as flagons, dishes, cups, etc, wrought in gold or silver...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

plate

noun dish on which food is served or from which food is eaten
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

plate

noun a flat sheet of metal or glass on which a photographic image can be recorded
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

plate

(plāt) a flat stratum or layer. dental plate; sometimes, by extension, incorrectly used to designate a complete denture. a flat vessel, usually a Petri dish, containing sterile solid medium for the culture of microorganisms. to prepare a culture medium in a petri dish, or to inoc...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001
No exact match found