ode

a lengthy ceremonial stanza that studies a single dignified subject and theme.
Found on https://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/a/american-poets-of-the-20th-century

ode

cantata-like musical setting of the lyric poetry form so called.
Found on http://www.library.yale.edu/cataloging/music/glossary.htm

Ode

lyric poem usually addressed to the subject, so written in the second person. There is no fixed rhyme or rhythm pattern. Language may be unusual, perhaps self-consciously 'poetic': Thou still unravish'd bride of quietness... (Keats, 'On a Grecian Urn').
Found on http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/primary/publications/literacy/63285/nls_fw

Ode

Ode (from ōidē) is a type of lyrical stanza. A classic ode is structured in three major parts: the strophe, the antistrophe, and the epode. Different forms such as the homostrophic ode and the irregular ode also exist. It is an elaborately structured poem praising or glorifying an event or individual, describing nature intellectually as well as ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ode

ODE

Ordnance Development and Engineering (Singapore)
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary262.php

Ode

• (n.) A short poetical composition proper to be set to music or sung; a lyric poem; esp., now, a poem characterized by sustained noble sentiment and appropriate dignity of style.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/ode/

ode

(from the article `Purcell, Henry`) The instrumental movements are the most striking part of the earliest of Purcell`s Welcome Songs for Charles II—a series of ceremonial odes that ... Purcell, a composer of occasional music who was also a brilliant choral writer, enriched the history of music with a series of odes and welcome song...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/o/6

ode

noun a lyric poem with complex stanza forms
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Ode

[ballet] Ode is a ballet made by Lorca Massine to eponymous music from 1943 by Igor Stravinsky. The premiere took place June 23, 1972, as part of New York City Ballet`s Stravinsky Festival at the New York State Theater, Lincoln Center. == Original cast == ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ode_(ballet)

Ode

Ode noun [ French, from Latin ode , oda , Greek ... a song, especially a lyric song, contr. from ..., from ... to sing; confer Sanskrit vad to speak, sing. Confer Comedy , Melody , Monody .] A short poetical composition proper to be set to music or sung; a lyr...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/O/11

Ode

A lengthy lyric poem that often expresses lofty emotions in a dignified style.
Found on http://www.word-mart.com/html/glossary2.html

Ode

A long, often elaborate stanzaic poem of varying line lengths and sometimes intricate rhyme schemes
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

ode

a lyric poem with complex stanza forms
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/2339887

Ode

a lyric song, the same as a stasimon.
Found on http://www.hestories.info/greco-roman-world-glossary.html

ode

a poem of high seriousness with irregular stanzaic forms.
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

Ode

A poem of high seriousness with irregular stanzaic forms. The regular pindaric or greek ode imitates
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429

ODE

Abbreviation for 'ordinary differential equation'. Contexts: math
Found on http://www.econterms.com/glossary.cgi?query=ODE

Ode

An ode is a short poem, frequently of irregular or complicated lyrical form, usually written for some special occasion. The term was originally applied to the choric songs of the Greek dramas, and also to the poems of Pindar, Sappho, Horace etc.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AO.HTM

ode

ceremonious poem on an occasion of public or private dignity in which personal emotion and general meditation are united. The Greek word d, which ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/o/6

Ode

Comes from the Greek word meaning song. Odes are normally written in an exalted style and are classified as either Pindaric (after Pindar) or Horatian (after Horace). Pindaric Odes have a triadic or three stanza structure - comprising a strophe (first stanza), an antistrophe (second stanza) and an epode (third stanza). When odes were originally sun...
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

ode

Grand lyric poem in praise of something or some person. Originally odes were sung, not spoken.
Found on http://www.menrath-online.de/glossaryengl.html

ode

Lyric poem with complex rules of structure. Odes originated in ancient Greece, where they were chanted to a musical accompaniment. Classical writers of odes include Sappho, Pindar, Horace, and...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

ode

Lyric poem with complex rules of structure. Odes originated in ancient Greece, where they were chanted to a musical accompaniment. Classical writers of odes include Sappho, Pindar, Horace, and Catullus. English poets who adopted the form include Edmund Spenser, John Milton, John Dryden, and John Keats
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0011364.html

ode

ode, elaborate and stately lyric poem of some length. The ode dates back to the Greek choral songs that were sung and danced at public events and celebrations. The Greek odes of Pindar, which were modeled on the choral odes of Greek drama, were poems of praise or glorification. They were arranged in...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0836363.html

ODE

Old-dog encephalitis
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22446
No exact match found