Motion

A proposal formally put forward or ‘moved`. In order to be voted on, a motion must have a proposer and seconder.

Motion

(in Scholasticism) The passing of a subject from potency to act. -- H.G.
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/m.html

Motion

(Lat. moveo, move) Difference in space. Change of place. Erected into a universal principle by Heraclitus. Denied as a possibility by Parmenides and Zeno. Subdivided by Aristotle into alteration or change in shape, and augmentation or diminution or change in size. In realism: exclusively a property of actuality. -- J.K.F.
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/m.html

Motion

(n) A motion is a formal request made to a judge in a law suit to issue an order or judgment concerning any matter in the suit. Motions are made for postponing trial, modification of an order or any matter concerned with the suit
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

motion

[n] - a state of change 2. [n] - a formal proposal for action made to a deliberative assembly for discussion and vote 3. [n] - a change of position that does not entail a change of location 4. [n] - the act of changing your location from one place to another
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=motion

Motion

• (n.) A puppet show or puppet. • (n.) An application made to a court or judge orally in open court. Its object is to obtain an order or rule directing some act to be done in favor of the applicant. • (v. i.) To make a significant movement or gesture, as with the hand; as, to motion to one to take a seat. • (v. t.) To direct or ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/motion/

motion

movement noun a change of position that does not entail a change of location; `the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise`; `movement is a sign of life`; `an impatient move of his hand`; `gastrointestinal motility`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Motion

[conference] motion is one of North America’s leading innovative and uniquely intimate events – bringing together an ever expanding scope of the brightest and most creative minds for an annual celebration of who we are: creatives. The first motion conference was held in 2006, as a regional event taking place in the Southwest part of the...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motion_(conference)

Motion

[democracy] A motion is a formal step to introduce a matter for consideration by a group. It is a common concept in the procedure of trade unions, students` unions, corporations, and other deliberative assemblies. Motions can be oral or in writing, the written form being known as a resolution. ==Proposing motions== A motion is generally pro...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motion_(democracy)

Motion

[geometry] In geometry, a motion is an isometry of a metric space. For instance, a plane with Euclidean distance as metric is a metric space in which a mapping associating congruent figures is a motion. More generally, the term motion is a synonym for surjective isometry in metric geometry, including elliptic geometry and hyperbolic geometr...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motion_(geometry)

Motion

[gridiron football] In gridiron football, motion refers to the movement of an offensive player at or prior to the snap. == Motion and shift == There is a distinction drawn between a shift and motion in football. A shift occurs when one or more players changes their position on the offensive side of the ball before the snap, causing a change...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motion_(gridiron_football)

Motion

[parliamentary procedure] In parliamentary procedure, a motion is a formal proposal by a member of a deliberative assembly that the assembly take certain action. In a parliament, this is also called a parliamentary motion and includes legislative motions, budgetary motions, supplementary budgetary motions, and petitionary motions. These can...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motion_(parliamentary_procedure)

Motion

[physics] In physics, motion is a change in position of an object with respect to time and its reference point. Motion is typically described in terms of displacement, direction, velocity, acceleration, and time. Motion is observed by attaching a frame of reference to a body and measuring its change in position relative to that frame. If th...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motion_(physics)

Motion

[software] Motion is a software application produced by Apple Inc. for their Mac OS X operating system. It is used to create and edit motion graphics, titling for video production and film production, and 2D and 3D compositing for visual effects. ==History== The original product, codenamed `Molokini,` was demonstrated on April 19, 2004. At ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motion_(software)

Motion

[surveillance software] Motion, a software motion detector, is a free, open source CCTV software application developed for Linux. It can monitor video signal from one or more cameras and is able to detect if a significant part of the picture has changed saving away video when it detects that motion is occurring (it can also do time lapse vi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motion_(surveillance_software)

Motion

Mo'tion intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Motioned ; present participle & verbal noun Motioning .] 1. To make a significant movement or gesture, as with the hand; as, to motion to one to take a seat. 2.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/106

Motion

Mo'tion noun [ French, from Latin motio , from movere , motum , to move. See Move .] 1. The act, process, or state of changing place or position; movement; the passing of a body from one place or position to another, whether voluntary or involuntary; -- opposed to
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/106

Motion

Mo'tion transitive verb 1. To direct or invite by a motion, as of the hand or head; as, to motion one to a seat. 2. To propose; to move. [ Obsolete] « I want friends to motion such a matter.» Burton.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/106

motion

1. The act, process, or state of changing place or position; movement; the passing of a body from one place or position to another, whether voluntary or involuntary; opposed to rest. 'Speaking or mute, all comeliness and grace attends thee, and each word, each motion, forms.' (Milton) ... 2. Power of, or capacity for, motion. 'Devoid of sense and m...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Motion

A formal request that a judge enter a particular order or ruling in a lawsuit. An oral motion may be made during trial -- for example, to strike the testimony of a witness or admit an exhibit. Often, motions are made in writing, accompanied by a written statement explaining the legal reasons why the court should grant the motion. The other party ha...
Found on http://www.nolo.com/dictionary/motion-term.html

Motion

A request asking a judge to issue a ruling or order on a legal matter. An application to a court by one of the parties in a cause, or his counsel, in order to obtain some rule or order of court, which he thinks becomes necessary in the progress of the cause, or to get relieved in a summary manner, from some matter which would work injustice. Wh...
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def2/m047.htm

Motion

A request by a party to a judge to settle a procedural issue in litigation.
Found on https://adata.org/glossary-terms

Motion

An application by one party to the High Court for an order in their favour
Found on http://www.hmcourts-service.gov.uk/infoabout/glossary/legal.htm

motion

An application made to the arbitrator(s) for the purpose of obtaining a rule or order directing some act to be done in favor of the applicant.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21119

motion

an oral or written request to the court made by a party for a ruling or order
Found on https://www.nycourts.gov/lawlibraries/glossary.shtml
No exact match found