Meteor

Also known as a 'shooting star' or 'falling star', is a bright streak of light in the sky caused by a meteorite as it burns up in the Earth's atmosphere.

Meteor

A meteoroid which is in the process of entering Earth's atmosphere. It is called a meteorite after landing.

Meteor

HMS Meteor was a British Lightning class destroyer of 1920 tons displacement built under the British War construction programme and launched in 1941. She was armed with six 4.7-inch guns; several smaller guns and eight 21-inch torpedo tubes. She was powered by two Admiralty 3-drum type boilers providing a top speed of 36.5 knots.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RM.HTM

Meteor

[juggling] A skill toy of Asian origin, the meteor consists of a rope, usually between 5 and 8 feet long, with weights attached to either end. Tricks are performed by swinging, wrapping and throwing the meteor about the body. == Origins == The meteor is based on the Chinese meteor hammer, a bolo-like weapon made from stones and rope. Approx...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meteor_(juggling)

METeOR

METeOR (Metadata Online Registry), Australia’s repository for national metadata standards for health, housing and community services statistics and information. METeOR is a Metadata registry based on the 2003 version of the ISO/IEC 11179 Information technology - Metadata registries standard. METeOR was developed to store, manage and disseminate ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/METeOR

Meteor

[train] Frisco locomotives No. 4500, 4501 and 4502, three of twenty-five Northern class Baldwin 4-8-4s built for Frisco during World War II were designated for use on the Meteor. These locomotives were delivered in a distinctive zephyr blue, white and gray paint scheme with `Meteor` spelled out across the tender in bold red lettering. These...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meteor_(train)

meteor

The luminous phenomenon seen when a meteoroid enters the atmosphere, commonly known as a shooting star.
Found on http://www.solarviews.com/eng/terms.htm

METEOR

acronym: Operational Weather Satellite (Russian Federation; formerly U.S.S.R.)
Found on http://cdiac.ornl.gov/pns/acronyms.html#M

Meteor

acronym: Research vessel (Germany)
Found on http://cdiac.ornl.gov/pns/acronyms.html#M

Meteor

A meteor is a meteoroid that has entered the Earth's atmosphere , usually making a fiery trail as it falls. It is sometimes called a shooting star. Most burn up before hitting the Earth .
Found on http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/dinosaurs/glossary/

Meteor

In particular, the light phenomenon which results from the entry into the Earth's atmosphere of a solid particle from space.
Found on http://www.imo.net/glossary

meteor

[n] - a streak of light in the sky at night that results when a meteoroid hits the earth`s atmosphere and air friction causes the meteoroid to melt or vaporize or explode
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=meteor

Meteor

A streak of light, lasting a few seconds at most, produced when a meteoroid enters the Earth's atmosphere. Most meteoroids are barely the size of a grain of sand and are thought to be cometary debris. In most cases the object is destroyed by friction in Earth's ionosphere at a height of about 100 to 160 km (60 to 100 miles).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20448

Meteor

aka Shooting Star - Streaks of light made when meteoroids enter the Earth's atmosphere.
Found on http://www.solarspace.co.uk/Glossary3.php

Meteor

Commonly called 'shooting stars', meteors are tiny specks of dust which the Earth sweeps into in its orbit. These dust grains enter the Earth's atmosphere at up to 70km per second - very fast! They cause the atoms in the atmosphere which they hit to glow with the heat produced as the meteor slows down. The meteor is destroyed by this process. Many ...
Found on http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/computing/MainPage/SecDepts/Physics/Resources

Meteor

A meteoroid that has entered Earth's atmosphere. See also: Meteorite, Meteoroid.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/m/e/meteor/source.html

Meteor

Destroyer class [AH]
Found on http://www.jedsite.info/index.html

Meteor

Me'te·or noun [ French météore , Greek ..., plural ... things in the air, from ... high in air, raised off the ground; ... beyond + ..., ..., a suspension or hovering in the air, from ... to lift, raise up.] 1. Any phenomenon or appearance in the atmosphere, as clouds, rain, hail, snow, ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/57

meteor

1. Any phenomenon or appearance in the atmosphere, as clouds, rain, hail, snow, etc. 'Hail, an ordinary meteor.' (Bp. Hall) ... 2. Specif., A transient luminous body or appearance seen in the atmosphere, or in a more elevated region. 'The vaulty top of heaven Figured quite o'er with burning meteors.' (Shak) ... The term is especially applied to fir...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

meteor

shooting star noun a streak of light in the sky at night that results when a meteoroid hits the earth`s atmosphere and air friction causes the meteoroid to melt or vaporize or explode
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=meteor

Meteor

• (n.) Specif.: A transient luminous body or appearance seen in the atmosphere, or in a more elevated region. • (n.) Any phenomenon or appearance in the atmosphere, as clouds, rain, hail, snow, etc.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/meteor/

Meteor

(from the article `Atlantic Ocean`) ...this period, having used it in 1899 to report from sea the results of the America`s Cup yacht races. In 1925–27 a series of scientific voyages by ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/79

Meteor

(from the article `apek, Karel`) ...three aspects of knowledge. Hordubal (1933) contrasts an inarticulate man`s awareness of the causes of his actions with the world`s ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/79

meteor

meteor 1. Any atmospheric phenomenon, now chiefly confined to technical use. Atmospheric phenomena were formerly often classed as aerial or airy meteors (winds), aqueous or watery meteors (rain, snow, hail, dew, etc.), luminous meteors (the aurora, rainbow, halo, etc.), and igneous or fiery meteors (lightning, shooting stars, etc.). 2. A luminous b...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2553/

Meteor

A body of matter that enters the Earth's atmosphere from space. While traveling through the atmosphere, these objects begin to burn because of friction and are sometimes seen as luminous streaks in the sky by ground observers. Many of these objects burn up completely and never reach the Earth's surface.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/m.html
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