matrix

A material that has an embedded crystal inside or emerging from it.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22291

Matrix

• (n.) Hence, that which gives form or origin to anything • (n.) A rectangular arrangement of symbols in rows and columns. The symbols may express quantities or operations. • (n.) The womb. • (n.) The cavity in which anything is formed, and which gives it shape; a die; a mold, as for the face of a type. • (n.) The five simp...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/matrix/

matrix

(from the article `cell`) ...consists of large polysaccharide (complex sugar) molecules in a water solution of inorganic salts, nutrients, and waste products known as the ... ...smooth. However, within this membrane is yet another series of folded membranes that form a set of flattened, disklike sacs called thylakoids. The ... [2 rel...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/49

matrix

(from the article `composite material`) The remarkable properties of composites are achieved by embedding fibres of one substance in a host matrix of another. While the structural value of ... ...conditions, and this led to the development of composites. While the structural value of a bundle of fibres is low, the strength of individual...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/49

matrix

(from the article `printing`) ...engraving per letter, that of the die, was required to make the letter as often as desired, and any two examples of the same letter would be ... The Ludlow is considered a combination machine; though it automatically casts slugs, it is related to hand composition by the way the matrices are ... [2 rel...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/49

matrix

(ma´triks) pl. ma´trices the intercellular substance of a tissue (such as bone matrix), or the tissue from which a structure develops (such as hair or nail matrix). a metal or plastic band used to provide proper form to a tooth filling. bone matrix the intercellular sub...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

matrix

ground substance noun the body substance in which tissue cells are embedded
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

matrix

noun mold used in the production of phonograph records, type, or other relief surface
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

matrix

(biology) In biology, usually refers to the extracellular matrix
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0015133.html

matrix

(mathematics) In mathematics, a square (n × n) or rectangular (m × n) array of elements (numbers or algebraic variables) used to facilitate the study of problems in which the relation between the elements is ...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0006702.html

Matrix

[archeology] Please provide full details about this image -- who took/created it, when it was taken/created, where it came from, and under what license it falls. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrix_(archeology)

Matrix

[bandy club] Matrix are a Hungarian Bandy club that compete in the most Hungarian tournaments. Matrix competed in the 2005/2006 Hungarian cup where they only managed to finish in fifth place out of six. Matrix have had players who have represented the Hungarian national bandy team, including Péter Bokor who played at the Bandy World Champi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrix_(bandy_club)

Matrix

[biology] In biology, matrix (plural: matrices) is the material (or tissue) in animal or plant cells, in which more specialized structures are embedded, and a specific part of the mitochondrion that is the site of oxidation of organic molecules. The internal structure of connective tissues is an extracellular matrix. Finger nails and toenai...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrix_(biology)

Matrix

[chemical analysis] In chemical analysis, matrix refers to the components of a sample other than the analyte of interest. The matrix can have a considerable effect on the way the analysis is conducted and the quality of the results obtained; such effects are called matrix effects. For example, the ionic strength of the solution can have an ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrix_(chemical_analysis)

Matrix

[chemistry] http://www.pjfarmer.com ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrix_(chemistry)

Matrix

[club] Matrix is a club in Berlin which opened in 1996. Located at Warschauer Platz 18 in ten basement vaults of the Warschauer Straße railway station, the discothèque houses up to nine bars and five dance floors. The venue has an overall size of 2,100 square meters, and is one of the biggest clubs in Berlin. Between 1996 and 2002 many in...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrix_(club)

Matrix

[geology] The matrix or groundmass of rock is the finer grained mass of material in which larger grains, crystals or clasts are embedded. The matrix of an igneous rock consists of finer grained, often microscopic, crystals in which larger crystals (phenocrysts) are embedded. This porphyritic texture is indicative of multi-stage cooling of m...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrix_(geology)

Matrix

[hair] The hair matrix produces the actual hair shaft as well as the inner and outer root sheaths. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrix_(hair)

Matrix

[jazz group] Matrix is a jazz fusion group from Appleton, Wisconsin, that started in 1974, noted for tight brass ensemble lines and complex musical themes. It made its biggest impact on the music scene in the 1970s, including appearances at the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1976 and 1977. The group re-formed in 1992, 2000, 2002, and 2009. Album...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrix_(jazz_group)

Matrix

[mathematics] Matrices of the same size can be added or subtracted element by element. The rule for matrix multiplication, however, is that two matrices can be multiplied only when the number of columns in the first equals the number of rows in the second. A major application of matrices is to represent linear transformations, that is, gene...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrix_(mathematics)

Matrix

[music] In music, especially folk and popular music, a matrix is an element of variations which does not change. The term was derived from use in musical writings and from Arthur Koestler`s The Act of Creation, who defines creativity as the bisociation of two sets of ideas or matrices. Musical matrices may be combined in any number, usually...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrix_(music)

Matrix

[numismatics] In numismatics, a matrix is an intermediate mould used in the process of manufacturing coins. A matrix has its design in the same sense as a die. The design is engraved convex into the matrix, which is used to create punches. The matrix step was developed in the 17th century for two main reasons. The original design in the mat...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrix_(numismatics)

Matrix

[printing] In hot metal typesetting, a matrix is a mold for casting a letter, known as a sort, used in letterpress printing. However in printmaking the matrix is whatever is used, with ink, to hold the image that makes up the print, whether a plate in etching and engraving or a woodblock in woodcut. In letterpress typography the matrix of o...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrix_(printing)

Matrix

Ma'trix (mā'trĭks) noun ; plural Matrices (măt'rĭ*sēz). [ Latin , from mater mother. See Mother , and confer Matrice .] 1. (Anat.) The womb. « All that openeth the matrix is mine.» Ex. xxxiv. 1...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/33

matrix

A general 3×3 matrix • (math.) A square or rectangular array of numbers, usually written enclosed in a large pair of parentheses. Matrices, which are added and multiplied using a special set of rules, are extremely useful for representing quantities, particularly in some branches of ...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/M/matrix.html
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