Knowledge

Loosely speaking, the sum total of the representations of the world contained in the mind, on all subjects (including our own selves) and involving all memory types. But avoid specific use of this term in technical arguments in favour of the more precise propositional knowledge (or as appropriate).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20408

knowledge

Awareness of or familiarity with something or someone, or confidence in the accuracy of a fact or other information. Knowledge is often defined as justified true belief, although philosophers...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Knowledge

Knowl'edge noun [ Middle English knowlage , knowlege , knowleche , knawleche . The last part is the Icelandic suffix -leikr , forming abstract nouns, orig. the same as Icelandic leikr game, play, sport, akin to Anglo-Saxon lāc , Goth. laiks
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/K/16

Knowledge

Knowl'edge transitive verb To acknowledge. [ Obsolete] 'Sinners which knowledge their sins.' Tyndale.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/K/16

knowledge

1. The act or state of knowing; clear perception of fact, truth, or duty; certain apprehension; familiar cognizance; cognition. 'Knowledge, which is the highest degree of the speculative faculties, consists in the perception of the truth of affirmative or negative propositions.' (Locke) ... 2. That which is or may be known; the object of an act of ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Knowledge

• (v. i.) That which is gained and preserved by knowing; instruction; acquaintance; enlightenment; learning; scholarship; erudition. • (v. i.) The act or state of knowing; clear perception of fact, truth, or duty; certain apprehension; familiar cognizance; cognition. • (v. i.) That familiarity which is gained by actual experience; pr...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/knowledge/

knowledge

(from the article `language`) ...transmission of the written and spoken word all over the globe, together with the rapid translation services now available between the major ... The propositional sense of knowing (i.e., knowing that something or other is the case), rather than the operational sense of knowing (i.e., knowing ... ...by...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/k/41

knowledge

knowledge 1. Acquaintance with facts, truths, or principles, as from study or investigation; general erudition: knowledge of many things. 2. Acquaintance or familiarity gained by sight, experience, or report. 3. The fact or state of knowing; the perception of fact or truth; clear and certain mental apprehension. 4. Awareness, as of a fact or circum...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/3008/

Knowledge

Information of which someone is aware. Knowledge is also used to mean the confident understanding of a subject, potentially with the ability to use it for a specific purpose.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_education_terms_(G

knowledge

the final goal of the understanding in combining intuitions and concepts. If they are pure, the knowledge will be transcendental; if they are impure, the knowledge will be empirical. In a looser sense, 'knowledge' also refers to that which arises out adopting any legitimate perspective.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary074.htm

knowledge

the final goal of the understanding in combining intuitions and concepts. If they are pure, the knowledge will be transcendental; if they are impure, the knowledge will be empirical. In a looser sense, 'knowledge' also refers to that which arises out adopting any legitimate perspective.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21178

Knowledge

Consumers' meanings or beliefs about products, brands, stores, that are stored in memory.
Found on http://archive.ifla.org/VII/s34/pubs/glossary.htm

Knowledge

(AS. cnawan, know) Relations known. Apprehended truth. Opposite of opinion. Certain knowledge is more than opinion, less than truth. Theory of knowledge, or epistemology (which see), is the systematic investigation and exposition of the principles of the possibility of knowledge. In epistemology: the relation between object and subject. See Episte....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/k.html

Knowledge

Information as to a matter or fact. Many acts are perfectly innocent when the party performing them is not aware of certain circumstances attending them. For example, someone may pass a counterfeit note and be criminally guiltless if they did not know it was counterfeit. Or someone may receive stolen goods if they were not aware of the fact that .....
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def/j069.htm

Knowledge

Knowledge is practical understanding.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AK.HTM

Knowledge

Knowledge is a familiarity, awareness or understanding of someone or something, such as facts, information, descriptions, or skills, which is acquired through experience or education by perceiving, discovering, or learning. Knowledge can refer to a theoretical or practical understanding of a subject. It can be implicit (as with practical skill or ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knowledge

knowledge

(skill) One of the 5 DKART skills that includes the facets or subcategories of LTM (long-term memory), STM (short-term memory), MM (muscle memory), code & decode, analyze, and channels.
Found on http://critical-gaming.com/critical-glossary/

Knowledge

The fruit of the union of mind and reality. The informing of the mind with intelligibles, or forms, or essences of things. Cognition. Possession by the mind of any of the forms of data from historical to empirical, from universals to the finite comprehension of the unveiled God to the blessed in heaven.
Found on http://catholicism.org/phil-glossary.html
No exact match found