gypsy

traditional term applied to romany nomads or travellers (see also 'romany'), whose traditional livelihoods included the making and selling of low-value forest products such as simple furniture and brooms, and the trading of horses, frequently reared in forests and sold at fairs on forest peripheries [where they might also perform entertainments];...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22223

Gypsy

[n] - a member of a nomadic people originating in northern India and now living on all continents
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=Gypsy

Gypsy

• (n.) One of a vagabond race, whose tribes, coming originally from India, entered Europe in 14th or 15th centry, and are now scattered over Turkey, Russia, Hungary, Spain, England, etc., living by theft, fortune telling, horsejockeying, tinkering, etc. Cf. Bohemian, Romany. • (n.) A cunning or crafty person • (n.) A dark-complexione...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/gypsy/

Gypsy

[calypsonian] Winston Edward Peters, also known by his sobriquet Gypsy is a Trinidad and Tobago politician and calypsonian and currently serves as the country`s Minister of Community Development in the People`s Partnership Coalition led by Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar. Peters also served as Minister of Arts and Multiculturalism fro...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gypsy_(calypsonian)

Gypsy

[catboat] The Gypsy (previously known as the Witch and the Wren) is a historic catboat whose home is in Wareham, Massachusetts. She was designed and built in 1900 by Bowdoin B. Crowninshield, as one of four identical sailing vessels, and was designated Crowninshield #149. Her design was influenced by the `Seawanhaka Rule`, instituted at the...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gypsy_(catboat)

Gypsy

[Lady Gaga song] ==Composition== `Gypsy` is a Europop and electropop song with classic rock and house influences. Adam Markovitz of Entertainment Weekly said `Gypsy` contains `barroom ivory-tickling` and a swooping hook. Rolling Stone described the song as an `eighties-style anthem`. According to the sheet music published at Musicnotes.com ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gypsy_(Lady_Gaga_song)

Gypsy

[musical] Gypsy is a 1959 musical with music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, and a book by Arthur Laurents. Gypsy is loosely based on the 1957 memoirs of Gypsy Rose Lee, the famous striptease artist, and focuses on her mother, Rose, whose name has become synonymous with `the ultimate show business mother.` It follows the dreams a...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gypsy_(musical)

Gypsy

[Of a Strange and Distant Time] `Gypsy (Of a Strange and Distant Time)` is a 1969 song by the progressive rock band The Moody Blues, from their album To Our Children`s Children`s Children, a concept album about space travel. Due to its long name, the song is often referred to on compilation albums as simply `Gypsy.` The song lyrics, related...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gypsy_(Of_a_Strange_and_Distant_Time)

Gypsy

[software] Gypsy was the first document preparation system based on a mouse and graphical user interface to take advantage of those technologies to virtually eliminate modes. Its operation would be familiar to any user of a modern personal computer. It was the second WYSIWYG document preparation program, a successor to the ground-breaking B...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gypsy_(software)

Gypsy

Gyp'sy (jĭp'sȳ) noun ; plural Gypsies (-sĭz). [ Middle English Gypcyan , French égyptien Egyptian, gypsy, Latin Aegyptius . See Egyptian .] [ Also spelled gipsy and gypsey .] 1. One of a vagabond race, whose tribe...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/G/71

Gypsy

Gyp'sy adjective Pertaining to, or suitable for, gypsies. Gypsy hat, a woman's or child's broad-brimmed hat, usually of straw or felt. -- Gypsy winch, a small winch, which may be operated by a crank, or by a ratchet and pawl through a lever working up and down.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/G/71

gypsy

1. One of a vagabond race, whose tribes, coming originally from India, entered Europe in 14th or 15th centry, and are now scattered over Turkey, Russia, Hungary, Spain, England, etc, living by theft, fortune telling, horsejockeying, tinkering, etc. ... 'Like a right gypsy, hath, at fast and loose, Beguiled me to the very heart of loss.' (Shak) ... ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

gypsy

A windlass or capstan normally used for raising the anchor chain.
Found on http://www.diy-wood-boat.com/Boating-terms.html

Gypsy

English name for a member of the Romany people. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Gypsy

English name for a member of the Romany people
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0001619.html

Gypsy

gyp, Gypsy Gypsy, gyp; a people now more often referred to as Romany.
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/3790/

Gypsy

Gypsy is British theatre slang for a dancer or chorus girl.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZG.HTM

Gypsy

Gypsy, Gipsy; Gypsies, Gipsies 1. A member of a people that arrived in Europe in migrations from northern India around the 14th century, now also living on all continents including Europe, North America, and Australia. Many Gypsy groups have preserved elements of their traditional culture, including an itinerant existence and the Romany language. ...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/3724/

gypsy

traditional term applied to romany nomads or travellers (see also 'romany'), whose traditional livelihoods included the making and selling of low-value forest products such as simple furniture and brooms, and the trading of horses, frequently reared in forests and sold at fairs on forest peripheries [where they might also perform entertainments]; f...
Found on http://info.sjc.ox.ac.uk/forests/glossary.htm

Gypsy

Travellers, also known as Egyptians, who worked in a variety of itinerant professions, including hawking, peddling, and fortune-telling. Believed to have originated in India.
Found on http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/static/Glossary.jsp
No exact match found