engine

  1. motor that converts thermal energy to mechanical work
  2. something used to achieve a purpose

engine

industrial machine, hence
Found on http://info.sjc.ox.ac.uk/forests/glossary.htm

Engine

A fire suppression vehicle that has a water pump and, typically, is designed to carry firehose and a limited supply of water.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_firefighting

Engine

An engine or motor is a machine designed to convert energy into useful mechanical motion. Heat engines, including internal combustion engines and external combustion engines (such as steam engines) burn a fuel to create heat, which then creates motion. Electric motors convert electrical energy into mechanical motion, pneumatic motors use compresse...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Engine

Engine

Any ground vehicle providing specified levels of pumping, water, and hose capacity but with less than the specified level of personnel.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_wildfire_terms

engine

industrial machine, hence
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22223

engine

(from the article `airplane`) ...1936). The first DC-2 was put in service on the Newark-Pittsburgh-Chicago run, after only 11 months` development time. In an era when American ... ...embayment. Several miles might be used at a time when a 1,000-foot airport runway was the norm. Long runways, either on land or on water, meant ... As t...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/31

engine

(from the article `military technology`) The invention of mechanical artillery was ascribed traditionally to the initiative of Dionysius the Elder, tyrant of Syracuse, in Sicily, who in 399 ... In general, the mechanical artillery of medieval times was inferior to that of the Classical world. The one exception was the trebuchet, an eng...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/31

engine

[n] - something used to achieve a purpose 2. [n] - motor that converts thermal energy to mechanical work
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=engine

Engine

• (n.) (Pronounced, in this sense, ////.) Natural capacity; ability; skill. • (n.) Anything used to effect a purpose; any device or contrivance; an agent. • (v. t.) (Pronounced, in this sense, /////.) To rack; to torture. • (v. t.) To assault with an engine. • (n.) A compound machine by which any physical power is applied t...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/engine/

engine

noun motor that converts thermal energy to mechanical work
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=engine

Engine

[computer science] An engine is a continuation-based construct that provides timed preemption. Engines which can contain other engines are sometimes called Nesters and engines which do not have this ability are then called flat engines or `solo engines`. To implement timed preemption there needs to be a clock. This clock can measure real ti...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Engine_(computer_science)

engine

Click images to enlargeDevice for converting stored energy into useful work or movement. Most engines use a fuel as their energy store. The fuel is burnt to produce heat energy – hence the name `heat engine` – which is then converted into movement. Heat engines can be classified according to the fuel t...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0025315.html

Engine

En'gine noun [ French engin skill, machine, engine, Latin ingenium natural capacity, invention; in in + the root of gignere to produce. See Genius , and confer Ingenious , Gin a snare.] 1. (Pronounced, in this sense, .............) Natural cap...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/E/41

Engine

En'gine transitive verb 1. To assault with an engine. [ Obsolete] « To engine and batter our walls.» T. Adams. 2. To equip with an engine; -- said especially of steam vessels; as, vessels are often built by one firm and engined by another. 3.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/E/41

engine

1. (Pronounced, in this sense,) Natural capacity; ability; skill. 'A man hath sapiences three, Memory, engine, and intellect also.' (Chaucer) ... 2. Anything used to effect a purpose; any device or contrivance; an agent. 'You see the ways the fisherman doth take To catch the fish; what engines doth he make?' (Bunyan) 'Their promises, enticements, o...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

engine

A device for converting stored energy into useful work. Most engines in use today are heat engines which convert heat into work, though the efficiency of this process, being governed according to the second law of thermodynamics is often very low. Heat engines are commonly classified according to th...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/E/engine.html

Engine

A engine is a machine that converts heat energy into mechanical energy.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_fuel_cell_terms

Engine

A fire suppression vehicle that has a water pump and, typically, is designed to carry firehose and a limited supply of water.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary093.htm

Engine

A loose term used for the aero-engine which provides the motive power for any flying machine or airship. Aero-engines are both liquid-cooled and air-cooled. The former have less drag, the latter need less maintenance because of the absence of 'plumbing.'
Found on http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/glossary/

engine

a machine that can convert any of various forms of energy into mechanical power or motion. See diesel engine; gasoline engine; internal-combustion ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/31

engine

a machine that converts chemical energy into mechanical energy.
Found on http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/gear-up/motorcycle-terms-and-glossary

Engine

A machine which produces power to do work, particularly one that converts heat into mechanical work.Diesel EngineAn internal-combustion engine in which the fuel is injected into the cylinder near the end of the compression stroke and is ignited by the heat of the compressed air in the cylinder.Four-Stroke EngineAn engine operating on a cycle which ...
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/e/n/engine/source.html

Engine

A program that processes scripts or data and outputs the processed content.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20660

Engine

A software package that enables the creation of a game without having to create every line of code from scratch. A good game engine provides the ability to create environments, objects, and characters, as well as the ability to move the characters and detect interactions between characters and environments, objects, and other characters. The engine...
Found on http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson28.html
No exact match found