contingency

  1. a possible event or occurrence or result
  2. the state of being contingent on something

contingency

(from the article `Indonesia`) ...particular products (clove production, for example, was limited to Ambon, nutmeg and mace to the Banda Islands) and, in the 18th century, pushed ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/134

contingency

(from the article `logic, history of`) ...two notions of the `possible`: (1) as what is not impossible (i.e., the opposite of which is not necessary) and (2) as what is neither necessary ... A proposition is said to be necessary if it holds (is true) in all logically possible circumstances or conditions. `All husbands are...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/134

Contingency

(Lat. contingere, to touch on all sides) In its broadest philosophical usage a state of affairs is said to be contingent if it may and also may not be. A certain event, for example, is contingent if, and only if, it may come to pass and also may not come to pass. For this reason contingency is not quite equivalent in meaning to possibility (q.v.);....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/c.html

contingency

[n] - the state of being contingent on something
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=contingency

Contingency

• (n.) Union or connection; the state of touching or contact. • (n.) A certain possible event that may or may not happen, by which, when happening, some particular title may be affected. • (n.) The quality or state of being contingent or casual; the possibility of coming to pass. • (n.) An event which may or may not occur; that ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/contingency/

contingency

noun the state of being contingent on something
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=contingency

Contingency

[philosophy] In philosophy and logic, contingency is the status of propositions that are neither true under every possible valuation (i.e. tautologies) nor false under every possible valuation (i.e. contradictions). A contingent proposition is neither necessarily true nor necessarily false. Propositions that are contingent may be so because...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contingency_(philosophy)

Contingency

Con·tin'gen·cy noun ; plural Contingencies . [ Confer French contingence .] 1. Union or connection; the state of touching or contact. 'Point of contingency .' J. Gregory. 2. The quality or state of being contingent or casual; the possibility of co...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/148

Contingency

a clause in a purchase contract outlining conditions that must be fulfilled before the contract is executed. Both, buyer or seller may include contingencies in a contract, but both parties must accept the contingency.
Found on http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/housing/sfh/buying

contingency

A condition that must be met before a contract is legally binding. For example, home purchasers often include a contingency that specifies that the contract is not binding until the purchaser obtains a satisfactory home inspection report from a qualified home inspector.
Found on http://www.eloan.com/s/show/glossary

Contingency

A condition that must be met before a contract is legally binding. For example, homebuyers often include a contingency that specifies that the contract is not binding until they obtain a satisfactory home inspection report from a qualified home inspector.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21398

Contingency

A designated amount of a budget which is added in anticipation of potential cost overruns.
Found on http://www.filmland.com/glossary/Dictionary.html#A

contingency

A factor that affects the effectiveness of shaping behavior via consequences (reinforcements or punishments). If a consequence does not contingently (reliably, or consistently) follow the target response, its effectiveness upon the response is reduced. But if a consequence follows the response consistently after successive instances, its abi...
Found on http://critical-gaming.com/critical-glossary/

Contingency

A provision in a contract stating that some or all of the terms of the contract will be altered or voided by the occurrence of a specific event. For example, a contingency in a contract for the purchase of a house might state that if the buyer does not approve the inspection report of the physical condition of the property, the buyer does not have ...
Found on http://www.nolo.com/dictionary/contingency-term.html

Contingency

A provision in a contract that requires a certain act to be done or a certain event to occur before
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Business/Real_Estate/

Contingency

a provision of an agreement that keeps the agreement from being fully legally binding until a certain condition is met. One example is a buyer's contract which is an oral or written agreement to do or not to do a certain thing, dual right to obtain a professional home inspection before purchasing the home.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary108.htm

Contingency

A sum of money included in a budget that is set aside for unforeseen circumstances. The monies can only be spent with the approval of the client.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20698

Contingency

Actions taken as part of risk management in the event of a disaster, emergency or crisis.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21612

Contingency

An additional amount or percentage added to any cash flow item (ie. Capex). Care is needed to ensure it is either to be spent or to remain as a cushion.
Found on http://www.duke.edu/~charvey/Classes/wpg/bfglosc.htm

Contingency

In rhetoric, it relates to the contextual circumstances that do not allow an issue to be settled with complete certainty.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary083.htm

Contingency

is the unexpected failure or outage of a system component, such as a generator, transmission line, circuit breaker, switch or other electrical element. A contingency may also include multiple components which are related by situations leading to simultaneous component outages.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21348

Contingency

Provision within a contract that renders an agreement incomplete until a designated event such as a survey or inspection occurs.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20452

Contingency

The dependence upon a stated event which must occur before a contract is binding.
Found on http://www.pmel.org/RealEstate-Mortgage-Glossary.htm

contingency

The idea that evolution consists of many branching points and that an organism's future evolution depends on previous branching points. This theory would predict that evolution is unlikely to produce similar species on different planets. It stands in contradistinction to convergent evolution.
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/C/contingency.html
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