context

all the factors which systematically determine the form, meaning, appropriateness or translation of linguistic expressions. One can distinguish between linguistic context (provided by the preceding utterances or text) and non-linguistic context (including shared assumptions and information).

ConTeXt

ConTeXt is a general-purpose document processor. It is especially suited for structured documents, automated document production, very fine typography, and multi-lingual typesetting. It is based in part on the TeX typesetting system, and uses a document markup language for manuscript preparation. The typographical and automated capabilities of Con...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ConTeXt

CONTEXT

Perhaps the most important word in archaeology is context. Context is the location of an artifact or feature in relationship with all other artifacts and features in three_dimensional space. It is the relationships between artifacts and features that help an archaeologist reconstruct human behavior.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21815

context

the phrases surrounding a passage.
Found on https://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/a/american-poets-of-the-20th-century

Context

(Context (contextual / contextualise)) Context is always an important aspect to consider whenever you analyse a text. Context refers to those particular elements of a situation that in some way or another affect the text (for example, the effects of time, place, ideology, social hierarchies, relationships, etc.). Importantly, language has two pote...
Found on http://www.englishbiz.co.uk/grammar/main_files/definitionsa-m.htm

context

[n] - the set of facts or circumstances that surround a situation or event 2. [n] - discourse that surrounds a language unit and helps to determine its interpretation
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=context

Context

• (a.) Knit or woven together; close; firm. • (n.) The part or parts of something written or printed, as of Scripture, which precede or follow a text or quoted sentence, or are so intimately associated with it as to throw light upon its meaning. • (v. t.) To knit or bind together; to unite closely.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/context/

context

linguistic context noun discourse that surrounds a language unit and helps to determine its interpretation
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Context

[computing] In computer science, a task context (process, thread ...) is the minimal set of data used by this task that must be saved to allow a task interruption at a given date, and a continuation of this task at the point it has been interrupted and at an arbitrary future date. The concept of context assumes significance in the case of i...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Context_(computing)

Context

[language use] Context is a notion used in the language sciences (linguistics, sociolinguistics, systemic functional linguistics, discourse analysis, pragmatics, semiotics, etc.) in two different ways, namely as == Verbal context == Verbal context refers to surrounding text or talk of an expression (word, sentence, conversational turn, spee...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Context_(language_use)

Context

Con┬Ětext' adjective [ Latin contextus , past participle of contexere to weave, to unite; con- + texere to weave. See Text .] Knit or woven together; close; firm. [ Obsolete] « The coats, without, are context and callous. Derham. »
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/147

Context

Con┬Ětext' transitive verb To knit or bind together; to unite closely. [ Obsolete] Feltham. « The whole world's frame, which is contexted only by commerce and contracts. R. Junius. »
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/147

Context

Con'text noun [ Latin contextus ; confer French contexte .] The part or parts of something written or printed, as of Scripture, which precede or follow a text or quoted sentence, or are so intimately associated with it as to throw light upon its meaning. « According to all the light t...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/147

context

A term referring to the environment in which an element (sound, word, phrase) occurs. The context may determine what elements may be present, in which case one says that there are 'co-occurrence restrictions' for instance 1) /r/ may not occur after /s/ in a syllable in English, e.g. */sri:n/ is not phonotactically permissible in English; 2) the pro...
Found on https://www.uni-due.de/ELE/LinguisticGlossary.html

context

context 1. A discourse that surrounds a language unit and helps to determine its interpretation. 2. The words, phrases, or passages that come before and after a particular word or passage in a speech or piece of writing and help to explain its full meaning. 3. The set of facts or the circumstances or events that form the environment within which ...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/3702/

context

discourse that surrounds and helps explain a word or passage
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/418206

context

discourse that surrounds and helps explain a word or passage
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/877974

context

In archaeology, an artefact's matrix (the sediment or material surrounding it), its provenance (its three-dimensional position within that matrix), and its association with other...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Context

Interior tissue of a fruiting body.
Found on http://www.fs.fed.us/r3/resources/health/field-guide/glossary.shtml

Context

means the events or circumstances leading up to or surrounding something: the political / economic / social / cultural / religious / textual / narrative etc setting in which something occurs, or which provoke it.
Found on http://www.nzqa.govt.nz/qualifications-standards/qualifications/ncea/subjec

Context

The background and specific circumstances of a subject, such as an author's lifestyle, or the weather during a train crash
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_history

Context

The broader setting for the scene (political, social, etc).
Found on http://www.improvcomedy.org/glossary.html

Context

The broader setting for the scene (political, social, etc).
Found on http://www.improvcomedy.org/glossary.html

Context

The broader setting for the scene (political, social, etc).
Found on http://www.improvcomedy.org/glossary.html

Context

The careful investigation of objects in situ usually gives far more valuable information, than just the object by itself. An object without provenance (place of origin) has lost its story.
Found on http://www.abc.se/~pa/uwa/glossary.htm
No exact match found