comedy

  1. light and humorous drama with a happy ending
  2. a comic incident or series of incidents

Comedy

Comedy (from the κωμῳδία, kōmōidía), in the contemporary meaning of the term, is any discourse or work generally intended to be humorous or to amuse by inducing laughter, especially in theatre, television, film and stand-up comedy. This sense of the term must be carefully distinguished from its academic one, namely the comic theatre, wh...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comedy

Comedy

(from Greekkomos, 'songs of merrimakers')
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

comedy

[n] - light and humorous drama with a happy ending
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=comedy

Comedy

• (n.) A dramatic composition, or representation of a bright and amusing character, based upon the foibles of individuals, the manners of society, or the ludicrous events or accidents of life; a play in which mirth predominates and the termination of the plot is happy; -- opposed to tragedy.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/comedy/

comedy

noun light and humorous drama with a happy ending
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=comedy

Comedy

[drama] A comedy is any sort of performance intended to cause laughter or the emotions associated with laughter. For ancient Greeks and Romans a comedy was a stage-play with a happy ending. In the Middle Ages, the term expanded to include narrative poems with happy endings and a lighter tone. In this sense Dante used the term in the title o...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comedy_(drama)

Comedy

Com'e·dy noun ; plural Comedies . [ French comédie , Latin comoedia , from Greek ...; ... a jovial festivity with music and dancing, a festal procession, an ode sung at this procession (perh. akin to ... village, English home ) + ... to sing; for comedy was original...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/114

Comedy

a literary work which is intended to amuse, and which normally has a happy ending. The term is usually applied to drama, but it can also be used for other literary kinds. Like many literary terms (tragedy and epic being prominent examples), the term has its origin in ancient Greece, but Aristotle's discussion on comedy in his Poetics is believed to...
Found on http://www.hestories.info/greco-roman-world-glossary.html

comedy

A play with a happy ending, intended to be funny, with a lot of misunderstandings between characters. At the end everything is solved (dénouement).
Found on http://www.menrath-online.de/glossaryengl.html

Comedy

A type of drama in which the characters experience reversals of fortune, usually for the better. In comedy, things work out happily in the end. Comic drama may be either romantic--characterized by a tone of tolerance and geniality--or satiric. Satiric works offer a darker vision of human nature, one that ridicules human folly. Shaw's Arms and the M...
Found on http://highered.mheducation.com/sites/0072405228/student_view0/drama_glossa

Comedy

Comedy is a dramatic composition of a light and amusing class, its characters being represented as in the circumstances or meeting with the incidents of ordinary life; distinguished from tragedy by its sprightliness, and the termination of its plot or intrigue being happy; and from farce by its greater refinement and moderation and by more of proba...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AC1.HTM

comedy

comedy, literary work that aims primarily to provoke laughter. Unlike tragedy, which seeks to engage profound emotions and sympathies, comedy strives to entertain chiefly through criticism and ridicule of man's customs and institutions.Although usually used in reference to the drama (see drama, West...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0813015.html

Comedy

Defined as a mode, comedy consists of materials selected and managed primarily to amuse us. Defined as a genre, comedy is characterized by plots leading to happy endings and by informal ('low') style. See the various theorists.
Found on http://faculty.cua.edu/johnsong/comedy/pages/terms.html

Comedy

In Aristotle (Poetics), a play in which chief characters behave worse than men do in daily life, as contrasted with tragedy, where the main characters act more nobly. In Plato's Symposium, Socrates argues at the end that a writer of good comedies is able to write good tragedies. See Comic. Metaphysically, comedy in Hegel consists of regarding real....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/c.html

comedy

Literary genre that aims to make its audience laugh. Drama, verse, and
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

comedy

Literary genre that aims to make its audience laugh. Drama, verse, and prose can all have a comic aim. Stereotypically, comedy has a happy or amusing ending, as opposed to tragedy, but it can also embody a far subtler structure and purpose. Traditional comedy, like tragedy, has human weakness as its primary focus but, instead of being destroyed, in...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0018577.html

comedy

the genre of dramatic literature treating trivial material superficially or amusingly or showing serious and profound material in a light, familiar, or satirical manner. Example: 'The Devil and Billy Marshall,' a comedy by Shel Silverstein, 1m.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20099

Comedy

The primary characteristic of comedy, denotatively from Aristotle's `Poetics,` is that the protagonist survives. Of course, in more recent times, what was formerly considered the connotative meaning of comedy has come to prevail. In theatrical productions as well as film, comedy has come to mean any work that elicits laughter from the audience or p...
Found on http://www.allmovie.com/glossary/term/comedy

comedy

type of drama or other art form the chief object of which, according to modern notions, is to amuse. It is contrasted on the one hand with tragedy ... [22 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/114
No exact match found