carol

  1. joyful religious song celebrating the birth of Christ
  2. a joyful song (usually celebrating the birth of Christ)

Carol

In architecture, the term carol described a small closet or enclosure built against a window on the inner side, to sit in for study - like a bay window. The term was used until about the 16th century.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TC.HTM

Carol

[Self-Titled] Reporting statistics of link lv-louis-vuitton.com; 0 records. Reports COIBot reported 0 links. ---- Below a full report on all use of the link lv-louis-vuitton.com. This list is intended to see how the external link gets used, it does not imply that involved accounts are having a conflict of interest in adding the link, or tha...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carol_(Self-Titled)

Carol

Originally a carol was a song associated with a round dance, the term came later to be applied to popular songs (as distinct from hymns) associated with the great annual festivals, such as May Day, the New Year, Easter, and Christmas. Christmas Carols were popular as early as the 15th century. The custom of singing Carols from house to house, colle...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/VC.HTM

Carol

[song] `Carol` is a song written by Chuck Berry, first released by him on Chess Records in 1958, with `Hey Pedro` on the B-side. `Carol` also appeared as the B-side to the `Johnny B. Goode` single on Epic Records. and on his first compilation album, Chuck Berry Is on Top. ==Covers== ===The Rolling Stones version=== This song was covered by ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carol_(song)

carol

an English genre which may have originated as a round dance. Texts could be in English, Latin, or both, and were frequently focussed on a joyful season: Easter, Christmas, or spring. The carol had a burden (the verses) and a refrain; the refrain might add an extra voice part.
Found on http://people.vanderbilt.edu/~cynthia.cyrus/ORB/orbgloss.htm

carol

[n] - joyful religious song celebrating the birth of Christ 2. [n] - a joyful song (usually celebrating the birth of Christ) 3. [v] - sing carols
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=carol

Carol

Car'ol noun [ Old French carole a kind of dance wherein many dance together, from caroler to dance; perhaps from Celtic; confer Armor. koroll , noun , korolla , korolli , v., Ir. car music, turn, circular motion, also Latin choraula a flute player, ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/27

Carol

Car'ol transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Caroled , or Carolled ; present participle & verbal noun Caroling , or Carolling .] 1. To praise or celebrate in song. « The Shepherds at their festivals
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/27

Carol

Car'ol intransitive verb To sing; esp. to sing joyfully; to warble. « And carol of love's high praise. Spenser. » « The gray linnets carol from the hill. Beattie. »
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/27

carol

Christmas carol noun joyful religious song celebrating the birth of Christ
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=carol

carol

noun a joyful song (usually celebrating the birth of Christ)
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=carol

carol

verb sing carols; `They went caroling on Christmas Day`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=carol

Carol

• (v. t.) To praise or celebrate in song. • (v. i.) To sing; esp. to sing joyfully; to warble. • (n.) A song of praise of devotion; as, a Christmas or Easter carol. • (n.) A song of joy, exultation, or mirth; a lay. • (n.) A round dance. • (v. t.) To sing, especially with joyful notes. • (n.) Joyful music, as of a...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/carol/

carol

broadly, a song, characteristically of religious joy, associated with a given season, especially Christmas; more strictly, a late medieval English ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/27

Carol

Carol is a English mixed name. The meaning of the name is `joy` Where is it used? The name Carol is mainly used In English.How do they say it elsewhere? Caroline ( In French and In English) Charles ( In English and In French) Caryl ( In English) For the opposite sex use: In Ancient Germanic (Latinized) : Carolus (M) See also In Polish, Scandinav...
Found on http://www.pregnology.com/index.php?boys and girls/Carol

carol

a hymn or poem often sung, as at Christmas, by a group, with an individual taking the changing stanzas and the group taking the burden or refrain. Wynkyn de Worde, Caxton's assistant, printed the first collection of carols in 1521. An example is 'I Saw Three Ships.'
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

carol

carol, popular hymn, of joyful nature, in celebration of an occasion such as May Day, Easter, or Christmas. The earliest English carols date from the 15th cent. The carol is characterized by simplicity of thought and expression. Many are thought to be adaptations of pagan songs. Despite the folk-son...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0810528.html

carol

Song that in medieval times was associated with a round dance; today carols are associated with festivals such as Christmas and Easter. Christmas carols were common as early as the 15th century. The custom of singing carols from house to house, collecting gifts, was called `wassailing`. Many carols, such as `God Rest You Merry Ge...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0000611.html

Carol

[Dilbert] album=Japandemonium artist=Mr. Big album cover == Fair use for Japandemonium: Raw Like Sushi 3 == This image, Japandemonium.jpg, is being linked here; though the picture is subject to copyright I (SkierRMH) feel it is covered by the U.S. fair use laws because: ==Source== Derived from a scan of the album cover (creator of this digi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carol_(Dilbert)

Carol

[music] A carol is in modern parlance a festive song, generally religious but not necessarily connected with church worship, and often with a dance-like or popular character. Today the carol is represented almost exclusively by the Christmas carol, the Advent carol, and to a much lesser extent by the Easter carol; however, despite their pre...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carol_(music)

Carol

A song or hymn celebrating Christmas.
Found on http://www.classicalworks.com/html/glossary.html

carol

since the 19th century, generally a song that is in four-part harmony, simple form, and having to do with the Virgin Mary or Christmas.
Found on http://www.library.yale.edu/cataloging/music/glossary.htm

Carol

English medieval strophic song with a refrain repeated after each stanza
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Entertainment/Music/

Carol

A hymn or poem often sung, as at christmas, by a group, with an individual taking the changing stanz
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429
No exact match found