canon

a contrapuntal form in two or more (voice or instrumental) parts in which the melody is introduced by one part and then repeated by the next before each previous part has finished (i.e., such that overlapping of parts occurs).
Found on http://www.library.yale.edu/cataloging/music/glossary.htm

Canon

(from Grk kanon, meaning 'reed' or 'measuring rod') Canon has three general meanings. (1) An approve
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

canon

(from the article `Christianity`) ...often revived. The other new moment began in the 12th century when new forms of religious life burst on the scene, especially among monks and ... ...the same with six red tassels on each side. A domestic prelate has a purple hat with six purple tassels on each side, and a privy chamberlain a ... ....
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/17

Canon

(from the article `Penderecki, Krzysztof`) Penderecki`s Canon for 52 strings (1962) made use of polyphonic techniques (based on interwoven melodies) known to Renaissance composers. Yet he also ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/17

Canon

(from the article `Polyclitus`) ...(c. 450–440 ; `Spear Bearer`), the latter work being known as the `Canon` (Greek: Kanon) because it was the illustration of his book by that name. ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/17

canon

(from the article `scripture`) Types of sacred literature vary in authority and degree of sacredness. The centrally important and most holy of the sacred texts have in many ... Old Testament canon, texts, and versionsNew Testament canon, texts, and versions...the Christian biblical canon took shape, Bishop Athanasius of Alexandria, in h...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/17

Canon

(Gr. kanon, rule) A term reminiscent of the arts and crafts, sometimes applied, since Epicurus who replaced the ancient dialectics by a canonics (kanonike), to any norm or rule which the logical process obeys. Thus John Stuart Mill speaks of five experimental methods as being regulated by certain canons. Kant defined canon as the sum total of all ....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/c.html

canon

[n] - a priest who is a member of a cathedral chapter 2. [n] - a contrapuntal piece of music in which a melody in one part is imitated exactly in other parts 3. [n] - a rule or especially body of rules or principles generally established as valid and fundamental in a field or art or philosophy 4. [n] - a complete list of saints t...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=canon

Canon

• (n.) A law, or rule of doctrine or discipline, enacted by a council and confirmed by the pope or the sovereign; a decision, regulation, code, or constitution made by ecclesiastical authority. • (n.) The part of a bell by which it is suspended; -- called also ear and shank. • (n.) A law or rule. • (n.) The largest size of type ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/canon/

canon

noun a rule or especially body of rules or principles generally established as valid and fundamental in a field or art or philosophy; `the neoclassical canon`; `canons of polite society`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=canon

canon

(music) Piece or passage of contrapuntal music in which one voice repeats the part of another, like an echo. The first vocal or instrumental part begins with the melody and is followed soon after by the second part imitating that melody note for note (though often starting on a different note ...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0019004.html

canon

(religious writings) In theology, the collection of writings that is accepted as authoritative in a given religion, such as the Tripitaka in Theravada Buddhism. In the Christian church, it comprises the books of the Bible. The canon of the Old Testament was drawn up at the assembly of rabbis h...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0000560.html

Canon

[basic principle] A canon is a rule or a body of rules or principles generally established as valid and fundamental in a field of art or philosophy. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_(basic_principle)

Canon

[fiction] In fiction, canon is the material accepted as part of the story in an individual fictional universe. It is often contrasted with, or used as the basis for, works of fan fiction. The term `canon` can be used either as a noun, referring to `the original work from which the fan fiction author borrows,` or as an adjective to describe ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_(fiction)

Canon

[hymnography] A canon is a structured hymn used in a number of Eastern Orthodox services. It consists of nine odes, sometimes called canticles or songs depending on the translation, based on the Biblical canticles. Most of these are found in the Old Testament, but the final ode is taken from the Magnificat and Song of Zechariah from the New...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_(hymnography)

Canon

[literary] See also :Category:University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_(literary)

Canon

[music] In music, a canon is a contrapuntal compositional technique that employs a melody with one or more imitations of the melody played after a given duration (e.g., quarter rest, one measure, etc.). The initial melody is called the leader (or dux), while the imitative melody, which is played in a different voice, is called the follower ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_(music)

Canon

[priest] A canon (from the Latin canonicus, itself derived from the Greek κανονικός, kanonikós, `relating to a rule`, `regular`) is a member of certain bodies subject to an ecclesiastical rule. Originally, a canon was a cleric living with others in a clergy house or, later, in one of the houses within the precinct of or close to a...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_(priest)

Canon

[priest] enjoyed personal immunity from jurisdiction of the secular local rulers. The chapter wielded the ecclesiastical jurisdiction in the North Elbian part of the archdiocese, to wit Hamburg, Ditmarsh, Holstein, and Stormarn. Thus until the breakthrough of the Reformation the chapter appointed the priests serving in the city`s parishes. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_(priest)|canons_(Domherr[en])

Canon

Can'on noun [ Middle English canon , canoun , Anglo-Saxon canon rule (cf. French canon , Late Latin canon , and, for sense 7, French chanoine , Late Latin canonicus ), from Latin canon a measuring line, rule, model, from Greek ... rule, rod, fr...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/17

Canon

A Canon is a church dignitary who possesses a prebend, or revenue allotted for the performance of divine service in a cathedral or collegiate church. Canons were formerly divided into canons regular, or those living a monastic life, and canons secular, those not so living. In England, besides the ordinary canons - who with the dean form the chapter...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/CXC.HTM

Canon

A canon is a musical composition in which the voices begin one after another, at regular intervals, successively taking up the same subject. It either winds up with a coda (tailpiece), or, as each voice finishes, commences anew, thus forming a perpetual fugue or round. It is the strictest form of imitation.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/VC.HTM

canon

a collection of books accepted as holy scripture
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/51610

Canon

A collection of books accepted as holy scripture.
Found on http://www.ibiblio.org/expo/deadsea.scrolls.exhibit/glossary.html

canon

a composition in which each part has exactly the same melody throughout the piece, starting at different points. The strictest form of imitation.
Found on http://www.whitstablechoral.org.uk/membership/glossary-of-musical-terms/
No exact match found