Canon

[literary] See also :Category:University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_(literary)

canon

literally, 'rule'; a technique in which one line is repeated in its entirety by another following a pre-established rule (e.g. 'wait four beats then play the melody starting at the same pitch'). The instructions do not have to be written out--they can be left as a puzzle for the performer to solve.
Found on http://people.vanderbilt.edu/~cynthia.cyrus/ORB/orbgloss.htm

Canon

Body of work considered to represent the highest literary standards.
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

canon

[n] - a priest who is a member of a cathedral chapter 2. [n] - a contrapuntal piece of music in which a melody in one part is imitated exactly in other parts 3. [n] - a rule or especially body of rules or principles generally established as valid and fundamental in a field or art or philosophy 4. [n] - a complete list of saints t...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=canon

Canon

A body of writing that is recognised by authority. Books of holy scripture accepted by religious leaders as genuine are cannonical, as are works of a literary author which are regarded by scholars as authentic. The canon of a national literature is the body of writings particularly approved by critics and anthologists which are deemed suitable for ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk

Canon

Type of composition in which one musical line strictly imitates another at a fixed distance throughout.
Found on http://www.cbso.co.uk/?page=concerts/glossary.html

canon

In theology, the collection of writings that is accepted as authoritative in a given religion, such as the Tripitaka in Theravada Buddhism. In the Christian church, it comprises the...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

canon

In the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches, a type of priest. Canons, headed by the dean, are attached to a cathedral and constitute the chapter. Originally, in the Catholic Church, a canon was a...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Canon

A standard of judgement or authority; in art history usually refers to a group of works accepted to have been produced by a particular artist or school
Found on http://www.ifla.org/VII/s30/pub/mg1.htm#5

Canon

The Canon of Scripture in Christianity refers to the set of books selected from among the books of the Hebrew Scriptures, the dozens of gospels, and many dozens of epistles, to form the Bible. Some canons contain just the 39 books of the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament) and 27 books in the Christian Scriptures (New Testament). Other canons include...
Found on http://www.stpeter.dircon.co.uk/pages/glossary/glossaryc.htm

Canon

Can'on noun [ Middle English canon , canoun , Anglo-Saxon canon rule (cf. French canon , Late Latin canon , and, for sense 7, French chanoine , Late Latin canonicus ), from Latin canon a measuring line, rule, model, from Greek ... rule, rod, fr...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/17

canon

noun a rule or especially body of rules or principles generally established as valid and fundamental in a field or art or philosophy; `the neoclassical canon`; `canons of polite society`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=canon

canon

noun a priest who is a member of a cathedral chapter
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=canon

Canon

• (n.) A law, or rule of doctrine or discipline, enacted by a council and confirmed by the pope or the sovereign; a decision, regulation, code, or constitution made by ecclesiastical authority. • (n.) The part of a bell by which it is suspended; -- called also ear and shank. • (n.) A law or rule. • (n.) The largest size of type ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/canon/

canon

(from the article `Christianity`) ...often revived. The other new moment began in the 12th century when new forms of religious life burst on the scene, especially among monks and ... ...the same with six red tassels on each side. A domestic prelate has a purple hat with six purple tassels on each side, and a privy chamberlain a ... ....
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/17

canon

(from the article `scripture`) Types of sacred literature vary in authority and degree of sacredness. The centrally important and most holy of the sacred texts have in many ... Old Testament canon, texts, and versionsNew Testament canon, texts, and versions...the Christian biblical canon took shape, Bishop Athanasius of Alexandria, in h...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/17

Canon

(from the article `Penderecki, Krzysztof`) Penderecki`s Canon for 52 strings (1962) made use of polyphonic techniques (based on interwoven melodies) known to Renaissance composers. Yet he also ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/17

Canon

(from the article `Polyclitus`) ...(c. 450–440 ; `Spear Bearer`), the latter work being known as the `Canon` (Greek: Kanon) because it was the illustration of his book by that name. ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/17

canon

musical form and compositional technique, based on the principle of strict imitation, in which an initial melody is imitated at a specified time ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/17

Canon

Canon is a English boy name. The meaning of the name is `Holy Text` Alternative meanings (German) Holy Text This word is derived from a Hebrew and Greek word denoting a reed or cane. Hence it means something straight, or something to keep straight; and hence also a rule, or something ruled or measured The name Canon doesn`t appear In the US top 1...
Found on http://www.pregnology.com/index.php?boys/Canon

Canon

A canon is a musical composition in which the voices begin one after another, at regular intervals, successively taking up the same subject. It either winds up with a coda (tailpiece), or, as each voice finishes, commences anew, thus forming a perpetual fugue or round. It is the strictest form of imitation.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/VC.HTM

canon

someone's list of authors or works considered to be 'classic,' that is, central to the identity of a given literary tradition or culture.
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

canon

canon, in music, a type of counterpoint employing the strictest form of imitation. All the voices of a canon have the same melody, beginning at different times. Successive entrances may be at the same or at different pitches. Another form of canon is the circle canon, or round, e.g., Sumer Is Icumen...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0810217.html

canon

canon, in Christianity, in the Roman Catholic Church, decrees of church councils are usually called canons; since the Council of Trent the expression has been especially reserved to dogmatic pronouncements of ecumenical councils. The body of ratified conciliar canons is a large part of the legislati...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0810216.html

Canon

(Gr. kanon, rule) A term reminiscent of the arts and crafts, sometimes applied, since Epicurus who replaced the ancient dialectics by a canonics (kanonike), to any norm or rule which the logical process obeys. Thus John Stuart Mill speaks of five experimental methods as being regulated by certain canons. Kant defined canon as the sum total of all ....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/c.html
No exact match found