basilica

A large public building, in or near the forum of a Roman city, which was used as a town hall and law courts and housed shops. Rectangular in shape with a central nave and, usually, with a pair of side aisles lit by clerestory windows. The building type was used in the Christian period as the blueprint for early churches. Varieties would include: - …...

Basilica

A large building where town business was carried out (like a modern Town Hall)

Basilica

[moth] Basilica is a genus of moths of the Noctuidae family. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basilica_(moth)

Basilica

(Latin) a Roman public building used as an exchange and law court; the origin of the word basilica is the ancient Greek word basileus, king; a basilica was originally a royal palace, but for the Romans it served judicial and business purposes; according to Vitruvius' De Architectura Libri Decem, the dimensions of the basilica had to follow prescrib...
Found on http://www.hestories.info/greco-roman-world-glossary.html

basilica

[Noun] An oblong church with a rounded end.
Example: The choir was singing in the basilica.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

basilica

[n] - an early Christian church designed like a Roman basilica 2. [n] - a Roman building used for public administration
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=basilica

Basilica

Term originally used to describe a Roman town hall, but later to describe a rectangular hall-like building, normally with a roof supported by two or more arcades (ie aisled).
Found on http://www.digital-documents.co.uk/archi/gloschur.htm

basilica

town hall
Found on http://www.digital-documents.co.uk/archi/glos_rom.htm

basilica

Roman public building; a large, roofed hall flanked by columns, generally with an aisle on each side, used for judicial or other public business. The earliest known basilica, at Pompeii, dates from...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

basilica

A Roman building or early Christian church
Found on http://www.conservancy.co.uk/learn/wordlist.htm

Basilica

During the Roman Empire this was a type of large public building with an open interior and usually with side aisles separated from the main space by rows of evenly spaced columns. The same form was adopted as a building type for Early Christian churches. Basilica churches have a rectangular plan on an east west axis and contain one to three aisles....
Found on http://www.virtualani.org/glossary/index.htm

Basilica

Ba·sil'i·ca noun ; plural Basilicas ; sometimes Basilicæ (-sē). [ Latin basilica , Greek basilikh` (sc. o'iki`a or stoa` from basiliko`s royal, from basiley`s king.] 1. Originally, the palace of a ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/19

basilica

Origin: L. Basilica, Gr. (sc, or) fr. Royal, fr. King. ... Originally, the place of a king; but afterward, an apartment provided in the houses of persons of importance, where assemblies were held for dispensing justice; and hence, any large hall used for this purpose. ... 2. A building used by the Romans as a place of public meeting, with court roo...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

basilica

noun a Roman building used for public administration
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Basilica

• (n.) A digest of the laws of Justinian, translated from the original Latin into Greek, by order of Basil I., in the ninth century. • (n.) A building used by the Romans as a place of public meeting, with court rooms, etc., attached. • (n.) A church building of the earlier centuries of Christianity, the plan of which was taken from t...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/basilica/

Basilica

(from the article `Palladio, Andrea`) In 1546 Palladio prepared designs for the reconstruction of the 15th-century town hall in Vicenza, known since then as the Basilica, and in 1548 ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/28

basilica

in the Roman Catholic and Greek Orthodox churches, a canonical title of honour given to church buildings that are distinguished either by their ... [12 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/28

Basilica

(from Greek basilikos, `imperial`), 9th-century Byzantine code of law initiated by the emperor Basil I and completed after the accession of his son ... [6 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/28

Basilica

Originally a basilica was the palace of a king; but afterwards, the term applied to an apartment provided in the houses of persons of importance, where assemblies were held for dispensing justice; and hence, the term is applied to any large hall used for this purpose. The Roman basilica was used by the Romans as a place of public meeting, with cour...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TB.HTM

Basilica

originally a Roman, large roofed hall erected for transacting business and disposing of legal matters.; later the term came to describe an aisled building with a clerestory. Medieval cathedral plans were a development of the basilica plan type.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_architecture

Basilica

In ancient Rome the basilica was a public building which served several purposes of an institutional nature, both civil and religious. The building was generally rectangular and was divided by colonnades. The wall at one end formed a semi-circular or rectangular apse. The term later came to mean a Christian church which adopted the same design as t...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21096

basilica

basilica (busil'iku) , large building erected by the Romans for transacting business and disposing of legal matters. Rectangular in form with a roofed hall, the building usually contained an interior colonnade, with an apse at one end or at each end. The central aisle tended to be wide and was h...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/world/A0806397.html

basilica

Roman public building; a large, roofed hall flanked by columns, generally with an aisle on each side, used for judicial or other public business. The earliest known basilica, at Pompeii, dates from the 2nd century BC. This architectural form was adopted by the early Christians for their churches
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0000320.html

Basilica

The Latin word basilica (derived from Greek βασιλικὴ στοά, Royal Stoa, the tribunal chamber of a king), has three distinct applications in modern English. The word was originally used to describe an open, Roman, public court building, usually located adjacent to the forum of a Roman town. By extension it was applied to Christian build...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basilica

Basilica

A large building where town business was carried out (like a modern Town Hall)
Found on http://homeworkhelp.stjohnssevenoaks.com/glossary.htm
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