amber

Soft, fossilised resin from a prehistoric variety of pine tree, ranging in colour from pale yellow and honey to a redish-brown, brown, red, and almost black. Sea Amber mainly occurs along the southern shores of the Baltic sea, especially near Lithuania, although it is also found on the coasts of eastern England and the Netherlands; pit amber is min …...

amber

Amber (sucinum), the fossilised resin of an extinct species of pine, was one of the most prized gemstones of early Europe. The richest deposits in the world were found along the coast of the Baltic Sea. Roman traders reached the Baltic in the 1st century AD and for 150 years amber was carried southward on the Amber Road to Aquileia in northern Ital…...

amber

Fossilization where the organism is entrapped in resin and preserved whole.
Found on http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/glossary_2.html

Amber

Amber is a yellowish, fossilized tree resin (from conifers) that sometimes contains bits of trapped matter.
Found on http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/dinosaurs/glossary/

amber

[adj] - a medium to dark brownish yellow color 2. [n] - a hard yellowish to brownish translucent fossil resin 3. [n] - a deep yellow color
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=amber

Amber

A liquid from trees that has been fossilised over time to become hard. It has been used to make small items, such as beads. A major source of amber is the Baltic. It has been used in the region since the Bronze Age - beads from Simonside and Old Bewick, (both Northumberland) - onwards, especially in the Anglo-Saxon period. It was thought to bring g...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20766

Amber

Am'ber noun [ Middle English aumbre , French ambre , Spanish ámbar , and with the Arabic article, alámbar , from Arabic 'anbar ambergris.] 1. (Min.) A yellowish translucent resin resembling copal, found as a fossil in alluvial soils, with beds of lig...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/66

Amber

Am'ber adjective 1. Consisting of amber; made of amber. ' Amber bracelets.' Shak. 2. Resembling amber, especially in color; amber- colored. 'The amber morn.' Tennyson.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/67

Amber

Am'ber transitive verb [ past participle & p. adjective Ambered .] 1. To scent or flavor with ambergris; as, ambered wine. 2. To preserve in amber; as, an ambered fly.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/67

amber

1. <chemical> A yellowish translucent resin resembling copal, found as a fossil in alluvial soils, with beds of lignite, or on the seashore in many places. It takes a fine polish, and is used for pipe mouthpieces, beads, etc, and as a basis for a fine varnish. By friction, it becomes strongly electric. ... 2. Amber colour, or anything amber-c...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

amber

brownish-yellow adjective of a medium to dark brownish yellow color
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=amber

amber

gold noun a deep yellow color; `an amber light illuminated the room`; `he admired the gold of her hair`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=amber

amber

noun a hard yellowish to brownish translucent fossil resin; used for jewelry
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=amber

Amber

• (n.) Amber color, or anything amber-colored; a clear light yellow; as, the amber of the sky. • (n.) Ambergris. • (v. t.) To preserve in amber; as, an ambered fly. • (n.) The balsam, liquidambar. • (a.) Consisting of amber; made of amber. • (a.) Resembling amber, especially in color; amber-colored. • (v. t.) To s...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/amber/

amber

fossil tree resin that has achieved a stable state through loss of volatile constituents and chemical change after burial in the ground. Amber has ... [5 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/57

Amber

Amber is a Arabic girl name. The meaning of the name is `yellow-brown, precious jewel ` Where is it used? The name Amber is mainly used In English.How do they say it elsewhere? Ambra ( In Italian) Ambre ( In French) Amber appears In 2007`s top-1000 name list at rank 146. The name reached the top-100 16 times. 1990 was a `top year` for the
Found on http://www.pregnology.com/index.php?girls/Amber

Amber

[The One-Legged Hypoglycemic] ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amber_(The_One-Legged_Hypoglycemic)

Amber

HMS Amber (formerly the Cape Barfleur) was a British armed trawler of 700 tons displacement launched in 1934 and used by the British navy during the Second World War for anti-submarine training. HMS Amber had a top speed of 12 knots and was armed with one 4-inch gun and depth charges.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RA.HTM

Amber

[given name] Amber is a masculine or feminine given name taken from amber, the fossilized tree resin that is often used in the making of jewelry. Many boys in the middle eastern countries are also named Amber. The word is derived from the Arabic عنبر or anbar. The word can also refer to a yellowish-orange color. Amber has been a popular...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amber_(given_name)

Amber

Amber is American slang for tobacco juice.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZA.HTM

Amber

Amber is American slang for tobacco juice.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZA.HTM

amber

Type: Term Pronunciation: am′bĕr Definitions: 1. A hard, dark yellow to tan, fossilized resin derived from pine trees. 2. Having a dark yellow to tan color. See: amber codon
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=2650

AMBER

Type: Abbreviation Pronunciation: am′bĕr Definitions: 1. Acronym for advanced multiple-beam equalization radiography.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=2649

Amber

name for fossil resin or tree sap that is appreciated for its colour.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_geology

Amber

Derived from Arabic, amber is a fossilized resin, reddish-yellow in colour and more or less transparant. It has been used from ancient times to make trinkets and jewellery.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21096
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