allegory

  1. a short moral story (often with animal characters)
  2. a visible symbol representing an abstract idea
  3. an expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor

Allegory

An allegory is a fictional work or artistic expression that has an important symbolic meaning that parallels the literal interpretation.

Allegory

[Filippino Lippi] Allegory is a painting by the Italian Renaissance master Filippino Lippi, executed around 1498. It is now housed in the Uffizi Gallery of Florence. The work had been variously assigned, from Leonardo da Vinci to an unknown 15th century painter. The scene is set on a hill, with Florence in the background. It features a man,...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allegory_(Filippino_Lippi)

Allegory

literally, 'saying something else'; a story in which characters, objects, and actions have metaphorical meaning.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/10135

allegory

a play in which people, things, and happenings have another meaning. Example: 'Dansen,' an allegory by Bertolt Brecht, translated by Rose and Martin Kastner, 2m.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20099

Allegory

A poem in which the characters or descriptions convey a hidden symbolic or moral message. For example, the various knights in The Faerie Queene by Edmund Spenser are allegorical representations of virtues such as truth, friendship and justice.
Another example of allegory is Absalom and Achitophel by Dryden. In this poem Dryden uses a biblical sc...
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

allegory

[n] - an expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=allegory

allegory

In art, a story or message represented visually. Sometimes the literal meaning in the painting is clear, but some examples can be interpreted as having another, parallel meaning. In the second...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

allegory

In literature, the description or illustration of one thing in terms of another, or the personification of abstract ideas. The term is also used for a work of poetry or prose in the form of an...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Allegory

In art, a composition in which all the elements are designed to symbolise or illustrate some general idea such as life, death, love, virtue, faith, justice, prudence and so on.
Found on http://www.tate.org.uk/collections/glossary/definition.jsp?entryId=20

Allegory

Al'le·go·ry noun ; plural Allegories [ Latin allegoria , Greek ..., description of one thing under the image of another; ... other + ... to speak in the assembly, harangue, ... place of assembly, from ... to assemble: confer French allégorie .] 1. A figurative sen...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/57

Allegory

• (n.) A figurative sentence or discourse, in which the principal subject is described by another subject resembling it in its properties and circumstances. The real subject is thus kept out of view, and we are left to collect the intentions of the writer or speaker by the resemblance of the secondary to the primary subject. • (n.) Anythi...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/allegory/

allegory

a symbolic fictional narrative that conveys a meaning not explicitly set forth in the narrative. Allegory, which encompasses such forms as fable, ... [15 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/48

allegory

allegory 1. A work in which the characters and events are to be understood as representing other things and symbolically expressing a deeper, often spiritual, moral, or political meaning. 2. The symbolic expression of a deeper meaning through a story or scene acted out by human, animal, or mythical characters. 3. A symbolic representation of some...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/54/

allegory

Henry Cockeram, in his English dictionary (1623), explains this as 'A sentence that must be understood otherwise than the literal interpretation shewes' but does not distinguish among allegory, irony, metaphor, and symbol. Medieval scholars developed Biblical exegesis to allow for at least three types of allegory. Moral allegory interpreted a story...
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

allegory

A story in verse or prose which has a double meaning, one on the surface and a hidden meaning under the surface of the story; therefore such a story can be read and understood at two different levels. Very often, characters, events and settings represent abstract qualities such as Truth, Hope, Perseverance, Modesty and so on: allegorical characters...
Found on http://www.menrath-online.de/glossaryengl.html

allegory

allegory, in literature, symbolic story that serves as a disguised representation for meanings other than those indicated on the surface. The characters in an allegory often have no individual personality, but are embodiments of moral qualities and other abstractions. The allegory is closely related...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0803383.html

Allegory

This term is most often used in reference to literary genres but is associated with films as well. Allegory describes films in which there are one-to-one correspondences between events and characters in the context and content of the film and an outside situation often dealing with moral problems or universal events
Found on http://www.allmovie.com/glossary/term/allegory

Allegory

Allegory is a figurative representation in which the signs (words or forms) signify something besides their literal or direct meaning. In rhetoric allegory is often but a continued simile. Parables and fables are a species of allegory. Sometimes long works are throughout allegorical, as Spenser's Faerie Queene and Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress. When ...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AA.HTM

allegory

In literature, the description or illustration of one thing in terms of another, or the personification of abstract ideas. The term is also used for a work of poetry or prose in the form of an extended metaphor or parable that makes use of symbolic fictional characters. An example of the use of symbolic fictional character in allegory is the romant...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0000091.html

allegory

(art) In art, a story or message represented visually. Sometimes the literal meaning in the painting is clear, but some examples can be interpreted as having another, parallel meaning. In the second example, the literal content of the work can stand for more abstract ideas, perhaps suggesting ...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0097248.html

Allegory

The literal content or story of a work that stands for abstract ideas, suggesting a parallel, deeper, symbolic sense.
Found on http://www.latinart.com/glossary.cfm?sort=A

allegory

A story in which the author uses characters and events to represent characters and events from another source, such as the Bible. One example of allegory if The Pilgrim's Progress. The Chronicles of Narnia are sometimes referred to as allegories, but in truth they are not. See supposal, below.
Found on http://www.thelionscall.com/articles/glossary.cfm

Allegory

[category theory] In the mathematical field category theory, an allegory is a category that has some of the structure of the category of sets and binary relations between them. Allegories can be used as an abstraction of categories of relations, and in this sense the theory of allegories is a generalization of relation algebra to relations ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allegory_(category_theory)

Allegory

Allegory is a rhetorical device in which characters or events in a literary, visual, or musical art form represent or symbolize ideas and concepts. Allegory has been used widely throughout the histories of all forms of art; a major reason for this is its immense power to illustrate complex ideas and concepts in ways that are easily digestible and ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allegory
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