Voidable

Void'a·ble adjective 1. Capable of being voided, or evacuated. 2. (Law) Capable of being avoided, or of being adjudged void, invalid, and of no force; capable of being either avoided or confirmed. « If the metropolitan . . . grants letters of administration, such administr...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/V/33

Voidable

• (a.) Capable of being avoided, or of being adjudged void, invalid, and of no force; capable of being either avoided or confirmed. • (a.) Capable of being voided, or evacuated.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/voidable/

voidable

voidable 1. That which can be voided and especially annulled: 'He was told that the contracts were voidable.' 2. Capable of being nullified or invalidated. 3. In law, capable of being made or adjudged void.
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/3626/2

Voidable

Having no legal effect or consequence if the party affected so chooses. That which has some force or effect, but which, in consequence of some inherent quality, may be legally annulled or avoided. As a familiar example, may be mentioned the case of a contract, made by an infant with an adult, which maybe avoided or confirmed by the former on hi...
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def2/u043.htm

Voidable

(Adj) A voidable contract or rule or agreement is the one which is not automatically void but an affected party or authorized person can declare it void at a later stage. So unless it is declared void it is enforceable. A voidable contract gives an option to the parties effected to convert it as void or not.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

voidable

adj. capable of being made void. Example: a contract entered into by a minor under 18 is voidable upon his/her reaching majority, but the minor may also affirm the contract at that time. "Voidable" is distinguished from "void" in that it means only that a thing can become void but is not necessarily void.
Found on http://dictionary.law.com/Default.xhtml?selected=2227

Voidable

In law, a transaction or action which is voidable is valid, but may be annulled by one of the parties to the transaction. Voidable is usually used in distinction to void ab initio (or void from the outset) and unenforceable. The act of invalidating the contract by the party exercising its rights to annul the voidable contract is usually referred t...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voidable
No exact match found