Ophicleide

The ophicleide d is a keyed brass musical instrument similar to the tuba. It is a conical-bore keyed instrument belonging to the bugle family and has a similar shape to the sudrophone. == Name == The instrument`s name comes from the Greek word ophis (ὄφις)`serpent` + kleis (κλείς) `keys`, since it was conceived of as a serpent with ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ophicleide

Ophicleide

• (n.) A large brass wind instrument, formerly used in the orchestra and in military bands, having a loud tone, deep pitch, and a compass of three octaves; -- now generally supplanted by bass and contrabass tubas.
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Ophicleide

[organ stop] Ophicleide (pronounced `AHF-ih-klide`) and Contra Ophicleide are powerful pipe organ reed pipes used as organ stops. The name comes from the early brass instrument, the ophicleide, forerunner of the euphonium. The Ophicleide is generally at 16′ pitch, and the Contra Ophicleide at 32′. While they can be 8′ or 16′ reeds i...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ophicleide_(organ_stop)

Ophicleide

Oph'i·cleide noun [ French ophicléide , from Greek 'o`fis a serpent + ..., gen. ..., a key. So named because it was in effect the serpent, an old musical instrument, with keys added.] (Mus.) A large brass wind instrument, formerly used in the orchestra and in military bands, ha...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/O/23

Ophicleide

a powerful reed stop, much like the Bombarde; pitched as a 16′ or 32′ in the pedal division or found as an 8′ or 16′ on the manuals
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary317.php

ophicleide

brass wind musical instrument with a cup-shaped mouthpiece and padded keys, the bass version of the old keyed bugle. The name (from Greek ophis and ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/o/23

ophicleide

keyed bass brass musical instrument
Found on http://phrontistery.info/o.html

ophicleide

ophicleide (of'iklīd) [Gr.,=serpent with keys], brass wind musical instrument of relatively wide conical bore, largest of the keyed bugles; invented in 1817 by Jean-Hilaire Asté of Paris. It had from 8 to 11 keys and a full, loud tone; since its intonation was deficient, however, it...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0836722.html

Ophicleide

The ophicleide was a brass wind instrument, now replaced by the brass tuba, developed about the beginning of the 19th century from an ancient wind instrument called the serpent. It had a bell bottom, conical tube, and cupped mouthpiece, and usually contained eleven keys. Alto and double- bass forms of the instrument were constructed: but it was usu...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/VO.HTM
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