milonga

(from the article `tango`) ...1880 in dance halls and perhaps brothels in the lower-class districts of Buenos Aires, where the Spanish tango, a light-spirited variety of ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/93

Milonga

[dance] Milonga dance is dancing to milonga music. Milonga dance incorporates the same basic elements as Tango but permits a greater relaxation of legs and body. Movement is normally faster, and pauses are not made. It is rather a kind of rhythmic walking without complicated figures, with a more humorous and rustic style in contrast with th...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milonga_(dance)

Milonga

[music] Milonga is a musical genre that originated in the Río de la Plata areas of Argentina and Uruguay. It was very popular in the 1870s. It was derived from an earlier style of singing known as the payada de contrapunto. The song was set to a lively 2/4 tempo, as are most milongas. `Milonga is an excited habanera.` The original habanera...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milonga_(music)

Milonga

[place] Milonga is a term for a place or an event where tango is danced. People who frequently go to milongas are sometimes called milongueros. The term `milonga` can also refer to a musical genre. The music played is mainly tango, vals and milonga (as the musical genre). Most milongas are held on a regular basis (usually weekly), and they ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milonga_(place)

Milonga

The Milonga is a Spanish dance first originated in Andalusia. As the fascinating music traveled the world it assumed various aspects. In Buenos Aires the Gauchos danced it in what is called a closed position, in the lower class cafes. Here their interpretation of it emerged into what today is our Tango. The Milonga enjoyed a popular resurgence some...
Found on http://www.centralhome.com/dance-dictionary.htm
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