incuse

A design impressed into the surface of a coin to create an intaglio effect rather than a relief design.

incuse

Design elements are impressed into the surface (opposite of relief).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/10142

Incuse

• (v. t.) Alt. of Incuss • (v. t.) Cut or stamped in, or hollowed out by engraving.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/incuse/

Incuse

InĀ·cuse' adjective [ See Incuse , transitive verb ] (Numismatics) Cut or stamped in, or hollowed out by engraving. 'Irregular incuse square.' Dr. W. Smith.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/I/40

incuse

A design impressed into the surface of a coin to create an intaglio effect rather than a relief design..
Found on http://www.antique-marks.com/antique-terms-i.html

Incuse

A mark simply stamped or hammered in below the surface of the metal. Since such punches were cut proud of the die, they were easily damaged and although they were used by outworkers to mark small pieces, their use in the duty marks of 1784 - 1786 was soon superceeded by a punch which gave a cameo impression and both the punch and the piece being st...
Found on http://freespace.virgin.net/a.data/glossaryframes.htm

Incuse

Design elements of a coin that are impressed, not shown in raised relief.
Found on http://amhistory.si.edu/coins/glossary.cfm

incuse

impressed or stamped upon
Found on http://phrontistery.info/i.html

Incuse

in reference to coins, the action of stamping or hammering a figure on a coin; it is the impression made by the stamping of a coin.
Found on http://www.hestories.info/greco-roman-world-glossary.html

Incuse

Part of the coins design that has been impressed below the surface (intaglio).
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary100.htm

Incuse

The design of a coin which has been impressed below the coin's surface. When the design is raised above the coins surface it is said to be in relief.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary030.htm

incuse

The opposite of bas--relief; design is recessed rather than raised. Used when referring to coins, medals, tokens and other metallic items.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/10143
No exact match found