Immanence

Immanence refers to those philosophical and metaphysical theories of divine presence in which the divine encompasses or is manifested in the material world. Immanence is usually applied in monotheistic, pantheistic, pandeistic, or panentheistic faiths to suggest that the spiritual world permeates the mundane. It is often contrasted with theories o...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immanence

Immanence

• (n.) Alt. of Immanency
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/immanence/

immanence

(from the article `Platonism`) ...and hatred of the body seem to derive from non-Platonic and non-Greek sources). They stressed the transcendence of God though, by insisting that ... The two most important concepts that have been developed by theologians and philosophers for the interpretation of the divine are transcendence and ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/11

Immanence

(late Lat. Immanere, to remain in) The state of being immanent, present, or in dwelling. In Medieval Scholasticism a cause is immanent whose effects are exclusively within the agent, as opposed to transient. For Kant the immanent is experiential as opposed to non-experiential or transcendent. In modern metaphysics and theology immanence signifies.....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/i.html

immanence

immanence (im'ununs) [Lat.,=dwelling in], in metaphysics, the presence within the natural world of a spiritual or cosmic principle, especially of the Deity. It is contrasted with transcendence. The immanence of God in the world is the basic feature of pantheism. Among the most important philosop...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0825019.html

immanence

[n] - the state of being within or not going beyond a given domain
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=immanence
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