Epact

The epact (Latin epactae, from Greek: epaktai hèmerai = added days) has been described as the age of the moon in days on January 1, and occurs primarily in connection with tabular methods for determining the date of Easter. It varies (usually by 11 days) from year to year, because of the difference between the solar year of 365–366 days and the...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epact

Epact

• (n.) The moon`s age at the beginning of the calendar year, or the number of days by which the last new moon has preceded the beginning of the year.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/epact/

epact

(from the article `calendar`) ...from the date they indicated. It was Lilius who had proposed a more accurate system based on one that had already been in use unofficially while ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/35

Epact

E'pact (ē'păkt) noun [ French épacte , from Greek 'epakto`s brought on or in, added, from 'epa`gein to bring on or in; 'epi` on, in + 'a`gein to bring or lead. See Epi- , and Act .] (Chron.) The moon's age at the be...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/E/52

EPACT

Energy Policy Act
Found on http://www3.sympatico.ca/dhaughey/j1930.htm

EPAct

Energy Policy Act of 1992 (US)
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary136.htm

epact

excess of the calendar month over the lunar month
Found on http://phrontistery.info/e.html

Epact

In chronology, epact is the excess of the solar month above the lunar synodical month, and of the solar year above the lunar year of twelve synodical months. The epacts then are annual and menstrual or monthly. Suppose the new moon to be on the 1st of January: the month of January containing 31 days, and the lunar month only 29 days, 12 hours, 44 m...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AE.HTM
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