Dunnage

Wood frames used on concrete floors for stacking bags of rice. Prevents direct contact between the grain and the floor.

Dunnage

Dunnage is an inexpensive or waste material used to load and secure cargo during transportation, or support jacks, pipes, air conditioning and other equipment above the roof of a building. ==International Laws== When unloading a ship, sometimes there is a problem as to what to do with the dunnage. Sometimes the dunnage cannot be landed because of ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunnage

Dunnage

• (n.) Fagots, boughs, or loose materials of any kind, laid on the bottom of the hold for the cargo to rest upon to prevent injury by water, or stowed among casks and other cargo to prevent their motion.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/dunnage/

dunnage

(from the article `ship`) ...the cargo holds into cells that are sized precisely to hold stacks of containers. Labour within the hold is thereby reduced to insignificance. A ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/83

Dunnage

Naval Technically, packing material used to protect or wedge in cargo or stores; maritime slang for a person's clothes and/or baggage.
Found on http://www.britishempire.co.uk/glossary/d.htm

Dunnage

Dun'nage noun [ Confer Dun a mound.] (Nautical) Fagots, boughs, or loose materials of any kind, laid on the bottom of the hold for the cargo to rest upon to prevent injury by water, or stowed among casks and other cargo to prevent their motion.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/131

dunnage

A term applied to loose wood or other material used in a ship's hold for the protection of cargo.
Found on http://www.insurexchange.com/glossary/maritime.htm

dunnage

A term applied to loose wood or other material used in a ship's hold for the protection of cargo.
Found on http://ports.co.za/maritime-terms.php

Dunnage

Dunnage is the padding put in a ship's hold to stop the cargo moving about. Formerly it consisted of loose wood, as pieces of timber, boughs of trees, fagots etc, laid in the bottom and against the sides of a ship's hold, either to support the cargo when the vessel was loaded with heavy goods, or to prevent the cargo from being damaged by bilge wat...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RD.HTM

Dunnage

Loose packing material used to protect a ship's cargo from damage during transport. Personal baggage.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary101.htm

Dunnage

Materials or devices used in the securing and/or bracing of products during shipments.
Found on http://www.mhia.org/learning/glossary/d

Dunnage

Supports for air conditioning and other equipment above the roof of a building.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22195

Dunnage

Traditional warehousing for whisky maturation, which consists of a stone or brick building, ideally with an ash and earth-covered floor. Casks are stacked no more than three high on wooden runners. Most experts believe such warehousing creates the optimum maturation conditions for malt Scotch whisky.
Found on http://www.whisky-pages.com/about.shtml

dunnage

wood laid in hold to keep cargo dry and safe
Found on http://phrontistery.info/d.html

dunnage

Wood or other material used in stowing ship cargo to prevent its movement.
Found on http://www.aapa-ports.org/Industry/content.cfm?ItemNumber=978
No exact match found