Angst

Angst means fear or anxiety (anguish is its Latinate equivalent, and anxious, anxiety are of similar origin). The word angst was introduced into English from the Danish and Dutch word angst and the German word Angst. It is attested since the 19th century in English translations of the works of Kierkegaard and Freud. It is used in English to descri...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angst

Angst

(Ger. dread) Concern or care, which are the essence of dread. (Heidegger.) -- H.H.
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/a.html

Angst

noun an acute but unspecific feeling of anxiety; usually reserved for philosophical anxiety about the world or about personal freedom
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

angst

an acute but unspecific feeling of anxiety
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/675552

angst

an acute but unspecific feeling of anxiety
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/675552

angst

angst (German equivalent of anxiety) 1. A feeling of dread, anxiety, or anguish. 2. A feeling of anxiety or apprehension combined with a feeling of depression and neurotic gloom. In 1944, from German angst, 'neurotic fear, anxiety, guilt, remorse' from Old High German angust, from the root of anger. George Eliot used it (in German) in 184...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/3460/

Angst

Angst is an emotional state of anxiety without a specific cause.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/EA.HTM

angst

the Danish word for anxiety or dread. Kierkegaard used this term to refer to a special kind of existential fear, involving a person's fear of non-being. It therefore includes not only a fear of death, but a fear of the meaninglessness of life.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary078.htm

Angst

[n] - an acute but unspecific feeling of anxiety
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=Angst
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