Yiddish

[n] - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=Yiddish

Yiddish

Yid'dish noun [ German jüdisch , prop., Jewish, from Jude Jew. See Jew , Jewish .] A language used by German and other Jews, being a Middle German dialect developed under Hebrew and Slavic influence. It is written in Hebrew characters.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/Y/5

Yiddish

noun a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Yiddish

• (n.) A language used by German and other Jews, being a Middle German dialect developed under Hebrew and Slavic influence. It is written in Hebrew characters.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/yiddish/

Yiddish

[English words of Yiddish origin] the Yiddish language (from Yiddish Yidish 'Jewish', cf. German jüdisch)
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_Yiddish_origin

Yiddish

The language that was spoken, especially in the 18th-20th centuries, by Jews in Central and Eastern Europe, and brought with emigrants from those lands to Britain, the United States and elsewhere. It originated as a dialect of German, reflecting the fact that many of the forebears of the Central and Eastern European Jews lived in earlier centuries ...
Found on http://www.movinghere.org.uk/help/glossary.htm

Yiddish

A vernacular language of Ashkenazi Jews. It is a combination of medieval German with elements from Hebrew, Slavic and other romance languages. It has been used since the Middle Ages and continues to be used today (Smith and Green 1995
Found on http://www.thearda.com/learningcenter/religiondictionary.asp

Yiddish

Judeo-German; the everyday language of the Jews of Eastern Europe.
Found on http://www.congregationalbert.org/community/175-syndication/interfaith-fami

Yiddish

A language very similar to German, usually written in Hebrew characters, that was spoken chiefly by Ashkenazi Jews in Eastern Europe and the places to which those Jews migrated.
Found on https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Jewish_Glossary
No exact match found