Wye

• (n.) A kind of crotch. See Y, n. (a). • (n.) The letter Y.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/wye/

Wye

[rail] A wye or triangular junction, in rail terminology, is a triangular shaped arrangement of rail tracks with a switch or set of points at each corner. In mainline railroads, this can be used at a rail junction, where two rail lines join, in order to allow trains to pass from one line to the other line. Wyes can also be used for turning ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wye_(rail)

Wye

Wye noun ; plural Wyes 1. The letter Y. 2. A kind of crotch. See Y , noun (a) .
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/56

Wye

A three phase, four-wire electrical configuration where each of the individual phases is connected to a common point, the "center" of the Y. This common point normally is connected to an electrical ground.
Found on http://www.youngco.com/young2.asp?ID=4&Type=3

wye

a Y-branching pipe or railroad track arrangement
Found on http://phrontistery.info/w.html

Wye

Device used to split a larger supply line hose into smaller attack line hoses. A gated wye contains valves so that certain lines can be turned on and off.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary093.htm

Wye

HMS Wye was a British River Class frigate of 1460 tons displacement launched in 1943. HMS Wye was powered by two Admiralty 3-drum type boilers providing a top speed of 20 knots. She carried a complement of 140 and was armed with two 4-inch dual-purpose guns; ten 20 mm anti-aircraft guns and one Hedgehog multiple spigot mortar.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RW.HTM

Wye

hose coupling for splitting one line into two or more outlets, often a larger line split into two smaller ones; often a gated wye having separate valves for each outlet. Not to be confused with Siamese, which is used to bring two smaller lines together into one.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_firefighting_equipment

Wye

hose coupling for splitting one line into two or more outlets, often a larger line split into two smaller ones; often a gated wye having separate valves for each outlet. Not to be confused with Siamese, which is used to bring two smaller lines together into one.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary102.htm

Wye

River in Wales and England; length 208 km/130 mi. It rises on Plynlimon in northeast Ceredigion, flows southeast and east through Powys and Hereford and Worcester, and follows the Gwent–Gloucestershire border before joining the River Severn 4 km/2.5 mi south of Chepstow. It has salmon fisheries and is noted for its scenery
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0024500.html

Wye

Wye, river, c.130 mi (210 km) long, rising on Plynlimon Mt., W Wales, and flowing generally SE past Builth Wells (Wales), Hereford (England), and Monmouth (Wales) to the estuary of the Severn River. It is noted for its beautiful valley, especially the part that forms the Gloucestershire-Monmouthshir...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/world/A0852854.html
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