Vagueness

In analytic philosophy and linguistics, a concept may be considered vague if its extension is deemed lacking in clarity, if there is uncertainty about which objects belong to the concept or which exhibit characteristics that have this predicate (so-called `border-line cases`), or if the Sorites paradox applies to the concept or predicate. In eve.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vagueness

vagueness

[n] - unclearness by virtue of being vague
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=vagueness

Vagueness

• (n.) The quality or state of being vague.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/vagueness/

vagueness

noun unclearness by virtue of being poorly expressed or not coherent in meaning; `the Conservative manifesto is a model of vagueness`; `these terms were used with a vagueness that suggested little or no thought about what each might convey`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=vagueness

Vagueness

A term may be said (loosely) to be vngue if there are ''borderline cases' for its applicability, i.e. cases for which the rules of the language containing the term do not specify either that the term shall or that it shall not apply. Thus certain shades of reddish-orange in the spectrum are borderline cases for the application of the term 'red'. A....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/v.html

Vagueness

Uncertainty. Certainty is required in contracts, wills, pleadings, judgments, and indeed in all the acts on which courts have to give a judgment, and if they be vague, so as not to be understood, they are in general invalid. A charge of "frequent intemperance" and "habitual indolence" are vague and too general.
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def2/u080.htm
No exact match found