Taphonomy

Taphonomy is the study of decaying organisms over time and how they may become fossilized. The term taphonomy (from the Greek taphos, τάφος meaning burial, and nomos, νόμος meaning law) was introduced to paleontology in 1940 by Russian scientist Ivan Efremov to describe the study of the transition of remains, parts, or products of organi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taphonomy

Taphonomy

Taphonomy (which means 'laws of burial') is the science that studies the process of decay and fossilization. The Russian paleontologist Ivan A. Efremov coined the term taphonomy and founded the study of taphonomy in 1940.
Found on http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/dinosaurs/glossary/

taphonomy

taphonomy 1. The study of the processes by which animal and plant remains become preserved as fossils. 2. The scientific study of fossilization. 3. The study of the processes; such as, burial, decay, and preservation which affect animal and plant remains as they become fossilized. 4. The study of the transformation of organic remains after death...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2085/

taphonomy

The study of what happens to a fossil, from the time of its initial creation (e.g. the death of an organism or the imprint left by the movement of an organism) and the time that the fossil is discovered by a paleontologist. For example, shells or bones can be moved my running water, and later be compressed by overlying sediment. Taphonomy is often ...
Found on http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/glossary_2.html

taphonomy

The study of what happens to a fossil, from the time of deposition to the time that the fossil is discovered.
Found on http://www.scientificpsychic.com/etc/geology-glossary.html

taphonomy

The study of what happens to a fossil, from the time of its initial creation (e.g. the death of an organism or the imprint left by the movement of an organism) and the time that the fossil is discovered by a paleontologist. For example, shells or bones can be moved my running water, and later be compressed by overlying sediment. Taphonomy is often ...
Found on http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/gloss2geol.html
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