rummer

Large-bowled, shortish-stemmed drinking glass for long drinks such as beer and cider.

rummer

[n] - a large drinking glass (ovoid bowl on a stem) for drinking toasts
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=rummer

Rummer

Glass used from c 1780 for drinking toddy (rum punch) or naval grog (rum & water), short-stemmed, wide-bowled, with a capacity of between 8 & 15 fl oz. Foot sometimes star-cut or lemon-squeezer. Became popular again c 1820, but with larger & thicker foot
Found on http://www.great-glass.co.uk/glass%20notes/glossa-e.htm

Rummer

Short stemmed drinking glass with capacious thinly blown ovoid bowl and small foot.Later the glass became thicker and the feet heavier to hold the favourite Victorian drink of hot toddy!
Found on http://www.glamorganantiques.co.uk/glossaryglass.htm

Rummer

Rum'mer noun [ Dutch roemer , romer , akin to German römer , Swedish remmare ; perhaps properly, Roman.] A large and tall glass, or drinking cup. [ Obsolete] J. Philips.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/104

rummer

noun a large drinking glass (ovoid bowl on a stem) for drinking toasts
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Rummer

• (n.) A large and tall glass, or drinking cup.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/rummer/

rummer

(from the article `Römer`) An English goblet called rummer (from `Römer,` not `rum`) was first made similar to the German original but in the 18th century evolved into a very ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/78

Rummer

Rummers, Römers, or Roemers, were large drinking-glasses studded with prunts to ensure a safe grip, popular in the Rhineland and the Netherlands from the 15th through the 17th century. They lacked the flared bowl of the Berkemeyer and had much thinner walls. The hollow base was built up by coiling strands of molten glass around a conical core. R
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rummer

rummer

large drinking-glass
Found on http://phrontistery.info/r.html
No exact match found