Narsai

Narsai (sometimes spelt Narseh or Narses; ܢܪܣܝ, Narsai, name derived from Pahlavi Narsēh from Avestan Nairyō.saȵhō, meaning `potent utterance`, the name of a yazata; ca. 399–ca. 502) was one of the foremost of Syriac poet-theologians, perhaps equal in stature to Jacob of Serugh, both second only to Ephrem the Syrian. He is the most imp.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Narsai

Narsai

(from the article `Nisibis, School of`) intellectual centre of East Syrian Christianity (the Nestorian Church) from the 5th to the 7th century. The School of Nisibis (now Nusaybin, Tur.) ... ...didactic epic, the other a more artful composition in strophes to be sung by a choir or double choir. The most notable Syriac poet after the spl...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/n/8

Narsai

[Nestorian Patriarch] == Sources == Brief accounts of Narsai`s reign are given in the Ecclesiastical Chronicle of the Jacobite writer Bar Hebraeus (floruit 1280) and in the ecclesiastical histories of the Nestorian writers Mari (twelfth-century), ʿAmr (fourteenth-century) and Sliba (fourteenth-century). A long and detailed account of the s...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Narsai_(Nestorian_Patriarch)
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