Mashing

In brewing and distilling, mashing is the process of combining a mix of milled grain (typically malted barley with supplementary grains such as corn, sorghum, rye or wheat), known as the `grain bill`, and water, known as `liquor`, and heating this mixture. Mashing allows the enzymes in the malt to break down the starch in the grain into sugars...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mashing

Mashing

• (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Mash
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/mashing/

mashing

(from the article `beer`) After kilning, the malt is mixed with water at 62 to 72 °C (144 to 162 °F), and the enzymatic conversion of starch into fermentable sugar is ... The purpose of the mashing operation is to (1) mix the proper proportions of grains, (2) increase the availability of the starch for enzyme action, ... ...t...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/44

Mashing

Intercourse. Also mesh.
Found on http://www.timwoods.org/the-london-slang-dictionary-project/

Mashing

Mashing is the process of mixing and infusing crushed malts, unmalted grains and adjuncts with hot water from the hot liquor tank. As the grains and adjuncts mix with the hot water at specific temperatures, enzymes from the malt activate and convert the starches into sugars. At the same time that the starches are being converted to sugars, color is...
Found on http://www.westcoastbrewer.com/Beer_Glossary_and_Brewing_Terms.php

mashing

Mashing is the process of mixing crushed malts (and possibly grain adjuncts as well) with water, and holding the mixture at specific temperatures for specific periods of time. During mashing, enzymes which are naturally present in the malt convert the grain starches into sugars, which are in turn fermentable by brewers yeast.
Found on http://hbd.org/uchima/glossary/glossary.html

Mashing

The preparation of the wort, the liquid base of beer. Mashing converts starches to sugars by mixing malted barley with hot water.
Found on http://www.thehomebrewforum.co.uk/glossary.php

Mashing

The soaking of grist with boiling water to extract fermentable starch.
Found on http://www.clanmacdougall.net/scotch1.html
No exact match found