manor

originally a territorial unit of land held by an overlord, later in the Middle Ages it had the much looser meaning of any economic unit of land which could consist of all demesne land without tenants (R 168)
Found on http://info.sjc.ox.ac.uk/forests/glossary.htm

Manor

A manor in English law is an estate in land to which is incident the right to hold a court termed court baron, that is to say a manorial court. The proper unit of tenure under the feudal system is the fee, on which the manor became established through the process of time, akin to the modern establishment of a `business` upon a freehold site. The.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manor

manor

originally a territorial unit of land held by an overlord, later in the Middle Ages it had the much looser meaning of any economic unit of land which could consist of all demesne land without tenants (R 168)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22223

Manor

The land held by a lord - perhaps as payment for services or as a reward. This entailed various customs and obligations to and from the lord. The lord could expect his tenants to grind their crops at his mill; he would also have the pick of crops and livestock. In exchange the lord was to serve his superiors - as well as dispense justice at his ow...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20766

Manor

• (n.) The land belonging to a lord or nobleman, or so much land as a lord or great personage kept in his own hands, for the use and subsistence of his family. • (n.) A tract of land occupied by tenants who pay a free-farm rent to the proprietor, sometimes in kind, and sometimes by performing certain stipulated services.Manor: words in th...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/manor/

Manor

(Ancient Money Terms:) Small holding, typically 1200-1800 acres, with its own court and probably its own hall, but not necessarily having a manor house. The manor as a unit of land was generally held by a knight (knight's fee) or managed by a bailiff for some other holder.
Found on http://www.hemyockcastle.co.uk/money.htm

manor

(from the article `manorialism`) ...and landless were ensured permanent access to plots of land which they could work in return for the rendering of economic services to the lord who ... The kingdoms were normally divided for purposes of royal administration into cantrefs. These in turn consisted of groups of maenors occupied by the ......
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/28

manor

manor house noun the mansion of a lord or wealthy person
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Manor

[department store] Manor AG is a Swiss department store chain with its headquarters in Basel. With an estimated market share of 60%, Manor is Switzerland’s biggest department-store chain. The Manor Group extends to the 64 Manor stores employing some 10,600 personnel, and the Athleticum sports goods chain. The Group, which is owned by Gene...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manor_(department_store)

Manor

[play] Manor, a play by Martin Murphy, ran through March to April 2010 at the Tristan Bates Theatre in Covent Garden. It was described as `a fierce and disturbing debut play about North London gangsters by a new talent, well acted by a young cast that deliver a sit-up-and-take-notice ferocity of performance that had me on the edge of my sea...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manor_(play)

Manor

[Sefton ward] Manor is a Metropolitan Borough of Sefton ward in the Sefton Central Parliamentary constituency that covers the localities of Thornton, Little Crosby, and Hightown. ==Councillors== ==Election results== ===Elections of the 2010s=== ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manor_(Sefton_ward)

Manor

[Stockport electoral ward] Manor is an electoral ward in the Metropolitan Borough of Stockport. It elects three Councillors to Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council using the first past the post electoral method, electing one Councillor every year without election on the fourth. Together with Brinnington & Central, Davenport and Cale Green...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manor_(Stockport_electoral_ward)

Manor

Man'or noun [ Middle English maner , Old French maneir habitation, village, French manoir manor, prop. the Old French inf. maneir to stay, remain, dwell, Latin manere , and so called because it was the permanent residence of the lord and of his tenants. See Mansio...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/19

Manor

a landed estate, usually comprising a DEMESNE and lands held by VILLAGERs, BORDARs, or COTTAGERs and sometimes also FREE MEN, FRENCHMEN, RIDING MEN etc, which could vary in size from part of one village to several villages over a wide area; power over men (and women), ranging from civil to criminal jurisdiction; an estate in land giving authority a...
Found on http://www.msgb.co.uk/glossary.html

Manor

Ancient Measurement Terms: Small holding, typically 1200-1800 acres, with its own court and probably its own hall, but not necessarily having a manor house. The manor as a unit of land was generally held by a knight (knight's fee) or managed by a bailiff for some other holder. In later years, the power of the manor declined progressively in favour ...
Found on http://www.hemyockcastle.co.uk/measure.htm

Manor

Manor is a name given in England from the llth century to an estate of a certain kind. The system was also found in France, Germany. and other parts of Europe where feudalism prevailed, and something akin to it elsewhere. The origin of the manor has given rise to discussion. A Roman parentage has been claimed for it, but others think it originated ...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AM.HTM

Manor

Manor is slang for the home district felt to belong to a person or gang.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZM.HTM

manor

specifically, the district over which a lord had domain in medieval western Europe; in general, any landed estate.
Found on http://faculty.bsc.edu/jtatter/glossary.html

Manor

This word is derived from the French manoir, and signifies, a house, residence, or habitation. At present its meaning is more enlarged, and includes not only a dwelling-house, but also lands.By the English law, a manor is a tract of land originally granted by the king to a person of rank, part of which was given by the grantee to his followers, and...
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def2/m081.htm

manor

[n] - the landed estate of a lord (including the house on it) 2. [n] - the mansion of the lord of the manor
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=manor
No exact match found