Machicolation

Masonry gallery supported by corbels and provided with openings through which missiles could be dropped onto attackers below.

machicolation

A gallery projecting on brackets and built on the outside of castle towers and walls,with openings in the floor through which to drop molten lead, boiling oil, and missiles.
Found on http://www.pitt.edu/~medart/menuglossary/INDEX.HTM

machicolation

[n] - a projecting parapet supported by corbels on a medieval castle
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=machicolation

Machicolation

gallery or parapet projected on corbels with floor openings through which missiles can be dropped. Supposedly introduced to the west following the crusades. (Illustration)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20935

Machicolation

A corbelled wall-head with the corbels linked by small arches. In 'real' machicolation there were spaces at the heads of the arches for dropping offensive materials on people attacking the wall. Later the treatment became purely decorative. Related Words: Arch; Corbel, corbel table, corbelling; Wallhead
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20938

Machicolation

In the architecture of fortifications, an overhanging gallery projecting on brackets and built on the outside of towers and walls, with openings in the floor through which defenders could drop missiles and boiling liquids onto attackers. Also see: crenelation.
Found on http://www.virtualani.org/glossary/index.htm

Machicolation

Mach`i·co·la'tion noun [ Confer Late Latin machicolamentum , machacolladura , French mâchicolis , mâchecoulis ; perhaps from French mèche match, combustible matter + Old French coulis , couleis , flowing, from Old French & French couler to...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/2

machicolation

noun a projecting parapet supported by corbels on a medieval castle; has openings through which stones or boiling water could be dropped on an enemy
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Machicolation

• (n.) An opening between the corbels which support a projecting parapet, or in the floor of a gallery or the roof of a portal, shooting or dropping missiles upen assailants attacking the base of the walls. Also, the construction of such defenses, in general, when of this character. See Illusts. of Battlement and Castle. • (n.) The act of...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/machicolation/

machicolation

(from the article `castle`) ...the moats from being crossed. The gateway was often protected by a barbican, a walled outwork in front of the gate; and the passage through the ... ...hoardings, which were overhanging wooden galleries from which arrows, stones, and unpleasant substances such as boiling tar and pitch could be ... [2 rel...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/4

Machicolation

In architecture a machicolation is an opening between the corbels which support a projecting parapet, or in the floor of a gallery or the roof of a portal, for shooting or dropping missiles upon assailants attacking the base of the walls. They are more especially found over the gateways and entrances, but are also common in other situations. Parape...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TM.HTM

machicolation

openings in floor of projecting parapet or platform along wall or above archway, through which defenders could drop or shoot missiles vertically on attackers below. Murder holes
Found on http://www.castles-of-britain.com/glossary.htm

Machicolation

A machicolation (French, machicoulis) is a floor opening between the supporting corbels of a battlement, through which stones, or other objects, could be dropped on attackers at the base of a defensive wall. The design was adopted in the Middle Ages in Europe when Norman crusaders returned from the Holy Land. A machicolated battlement projects out...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Machicolation

Machicolation

A battlement brought forward on corbels to allow material to be dropped through gaps.
Found on http://great-castles.com/glossary.php

machicolation

space between corbels in a parapet
Found on http://phrontistery.info/m.html
No exact match found