intarsia

An Italian term for pictorial MARQUETRY or INLAID DECORATION found on 15th and 16thC Italian panelling and furniture. Various woods, tortoiseshell, metals and ivory were chosen for colour and texture to create a realistic architectural perspective, or a symmetrical still-life group of objects such as musical or precision instruments.

intarsia

Decorative technique in which various types of stone and gem pieces of different color and equal thickness are cut to the shape according to the design and then attached to a support.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22290

Intarsia

Intarsia is a form of wood inlaying that is similar to marquetry. The term is also used for a similar technique used with small, highly polished stones set in a marble matrix (see pietre dure). == History == The technique of intarsia inlays sections of wood (at times with contrasting ivory or bone, or mother-of-pearl) within the solid stone matrix...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intarsia

intarsia

(from the article `trompe l`oeil`) In Italy in the 15th century an inlay work known as intarsia was used on choir stalls and in sacristies, frequently as trompe l`oeil views of ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/26

Intarsia

[knitting] Unlike other multicolour techniques (including Fair Isle, slip-stitch colour, and double knitting), there is only one `active` colour on any given stitch, and yarn is not carried across the back of the work; when a colour changes on a given row, the old yarn is left hanging. This means that any intarsia piece is topologically sev...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intarsia_(knitting)

intarsia

A colored design knitted on both sides of a fabric.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary042.htm

Intarsia

A design created by knitting coloured yarns on both sides of a fabric. Intarsia designs are usually isolated motifs rather than repeat patterns.
Found on http://www.bestinthecountry.co.uk/clothing-terms-glossary

Intarsia

A flat knit fabric with solid-colored, geometric patterns. The sides of the fabric are identical.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22263

Intarsia

A form of inlay similar to marquetry; decorative inlaid panel or dimensional image.
Found on http://www.furniturecaretips.com/glossary.htm

Intarsia

a motif design knitted in solid colours into a weft knitted fabric.
Found on http://www.textilesintelligence.com/glo/index.cfm?SECTION=I

Intarsia

A technique of sinking a decorative design across an entire surface. Essentially a Mosaic inlaid within a wooden panel, table or chest. Elements may include ivory or precious stone.
Found on http://www.artisansofthevalley.com/comm_gloss3.html

intarsia

An Italian term for pictorial MARQUETRY or INLAID DECORATION found on 15th and 16thC Italian panelling and furniture. Various woods, tortoiseshell, metals and ivory were chosen for colour and texture to create a realistic architectural perspective, or a symmetrical still-life group of objects such as musical or precision instruments .
Found on http://www.antique-marks.com/antique-terms-i.html

intarsia

intarsia (intär'sēu) or tarsia,properly a form of wood inlaying. The term is sometimes applied to inlays of other materials such as ivory and metal. It is differentiated from marquetry by the basic veneering process of the latter. The term intarsia is specifically applied to a type of...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0825304.html

Intarsia

Intarsia is a knitting stitch in which colour changes are introduced into a garment, the yarns being twisted together to prevent the appearance of holes.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/PI.HTM
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