Hendiadys

use of two words connected by a conjunction, instead of subordinating one to the other, to express a single complex idea.
*It sure is nice and cool today! (for 'pleasantly cool')
*I love the Lord, because he hath heard my voice and my supplications. Psalms 116
*Perfecti oratoris moderatione et sapientia. Cicero, De oratore
Found on http://www.uky.edu/AS/Classics/rhetoric.html

hendiadys

[n] - use of two conjoined nouns instead of a noun and modifier
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=hendiadys

Hendiadys

Hen·di'a·dys noun [ New Latin , from Greek ... ... ... one by two.] (Gram.) A figure in which the idea is expressed by two nouns connected by and , instead of by a noun and limiting adjective; as, we drink from cups and gold , for golden cups .
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/33

hendiadys

noun use of two conjoined nouns instead of a noun and modifier
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Hendiadys

• (n.) A figure in which the idea is expressed by two nouns connected by and, instead of by a noun and limiting adjective; as, we drink from cups and gold, for golden cups.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/hendiadys/

hendiadys

hendiadys A figure of speech in which two words connected by a conjunction are used to express a single notion that would normally be expressed by an adjective and a noun [or expressed by two nouns or two adjectives joined, rather than by an adjective-noun combination] such as 'grace and favor' instead of 'gracious favor'; or as Virgil wrote: 'We d...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/972/

Hendiadys

Using two nouns linked by a conjunction to express a single complex idea.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary083.htm

hendiadys

a pair of nouns linked by 'and' that are substituted for an adjective-noun pair. Shakespeare was especially fond of employing this structure.
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

Hendiadys

Hendiadys (s; a Latinized form of the Greek phrase ἓν διὰ δυοῖν, hèn dià duoîn, `one through two`) is a figure of speech used for emphasis — `The substitution of a conjunction for a subordination`. The basic idea is to use two words linked by the conjunction `and` instead of the one modifying the other. English names for he...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hendiadys

Hendiadys

As Arthur Quinn defines the term in Figures of Speech, hendiadys is a peculiar type of polysyndeton
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

Hendiadys

A pair of nouns linked by 'and' that are substituted for an adjective-noun pair. Shakespeare was esp
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429

hendiadys

expression of adjective and noun as two adjectives
Found on http://phrontistery.info/h.html
No exact match found