Hangul

The Korean alphabet (South Korea: 한글, haːn.ɡɯl often romanized in English as Hangul; North Korea: 조선글, tɕosʰʌnɡɯl, romanized as Chosŏn`gŭl) is the native alphabet of the Korean language. It was created during the Joseon Dynasty in 1443, and is now the official script of both South Korea and North Korea, and co-official in the ....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hangul

hangul

(from the article `Jammu and Kashmir`) Among the wild mammals found in the state are the Siberian ibex, the Ladakh urial (a species of wild sheep with a reddish coat), the rare hangul (or ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/13

Hangul

[word processor] Hangul (also known as Hangul Word Processor or HWP) is a proprietary word processing application published by the South Korean company Hancom Inc.. It is used extensively in South Korea, especially by the government. Hangul`s support for the special needs of the Korean written language has gained it widespread use in South ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hangul_(word_processor)

Hangul

alphabetic system used for writing the Korean language. The system, known as Chosn muntcha in North Korea, consists of 24 letters, including 14 ... [9 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/13

Hangul

The Korean alphabet that consists of fourteen consonants and ten vowels. Hangul was created by a team of scholars in the 15th century at the behest of King Sejong. See jamo.
Found on http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/glossaries/unicode.html
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