Gothic

Revival A 19th century revival version of the medieval Gothic style. Sometimes called Victorian Gothic. Dates from approximately 1840 to WW1.
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Gothic

(12th-14th century)
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Gothic

(from the article `typography`) ...to surmount in a lifetime. As a result, to all intents and purposes, Japanese typographers have had only two typefaces to choose from—mincho, ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/g/52

Gothic

[adj] - characteristic of the style of type commonly used for printing German 2. [adj] - of or relating to the language of the ancient Goths 3. [adj] - of or relating to the Goths 4. [adj] - (literature) characterized by gloom and mystery and the grotesque 5. [n] - extinct East Germanic language of the ancient Goths 6. [n]
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Gothic

• (n.) The language of the Goths; especially, the language of that part of the Visigoths who settled in Moesia in the 4th century. See Goth. • (n.) The style described in Gothic, a., 2. • (n.) A kind of square-cut type, with no hair lines. • (a.) Of or pertaining to a style of architecture with pointed arches, steep roofs, windo...
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Gothic

noun a heavy typeface in use from 15th to 18th centuries
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Gothic

adjective of or relating to the Goths; `Gothic migrations`
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Gothic

[language] This category is for aircraft that are powered by two piston engines, turboprop engines, or electric motors (i.e. driven by propellers) that are mounted in a push-pull configuration. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_(language)

Gothic

[Unicode block] Gothic is a Unicode block containing characters for writing the East Germanic Gothic language. ...
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Gothic

Goth'ic adjective [ Latin Gothicus : confer French gothique .] 1. Pertaining to the Goths; as, Gothic customs; also, rude; barbarous. 2. (Architecture) Of or pertaining to a style of architecture with pointed arches, steep roofs, windows large in proportion ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/G/46

Gothic

Goth'ic noun 1. The language of the Goths; especially, the language of that part of the Visigoths who settled in Moesia in the 4th century. See Goth . » Bishop Ulfilas or Walfila translated most of the Bible into Gothic about the Middle of the 4th century. The portion of this transl...
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gothic

A sans serif font style.
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Gothic

A European movement beginning in France. Gothic sculpture emerged c. 1200, Gothic painting later in the thirteenth century. The artworks are characterized by a linear, graceful, elegant style more naturalistic than that which had existed previously in Europe.
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Gothic

A pointed arch style of architecture both medieval and Victorian
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Gothic

A style in architecture, sculpture and pointing between the 12th and the 16th centurv. During the neo-classical 18th century, a syn. for the barbarous and lawless, the 'romanticists' who reacted against the 18th century classicism, reverted to a love for the medieval Gothic styles. -- L.V.
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gothic

A style of architecture and art dominant in Europe from the 12th to the 15th century. Gothic architecture features pointed arches, ribbed vaults, and often large areas of stained glass.
Found on http://www.modernsculpture.com/glossary.htm

Gothic

A style of architecture which flourished in Western Europe between the twelfth and sixteenth centuries. In England it included Early English, Decorated and Perpendicular styles.
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Gothic

a style of architecture which predominated throughout Europe from 12th to early 16th centuries. Evolved from the Romanesque, it is characterised by the pointed arch, ribbed vaults and elaborate traceried window openings. Gothic architecture in England is usually broken down into three phas...
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Gothic

A style of art and architecture, and also a period of culture, usually associated with the Middle Ages, from c. 1150-1500. Gothic was essentially a northern European style. Many people think of the pointed arch as the essential of Gothic style. Decoration is often based on nature - can be very realistic, or can be grotesque.
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Gothic

Architectural style that is typically European such as medieval castles or structures.
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Gothic

Art, architecture or decoration styles dating from after the Norman period but before the renaissance.
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Gothic

Art, architecture or decoration styles dating from after the Norman period but before the renaissance.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22200

gothic

general term for a style of architecture and ornament prevalent between the twelfth and sixteenth centuries, considered old-fashioned in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, characterized by pointed arches, ribbed vaulting, and flying buttresses, and by grotesque decorations; when it came back into fashion in the mid-1700s, it was celebr...
Found on http://faculty.bsc.edu/jtatter/glossary.html

Gothic

In architecture a the term Gothic refers to something off or pertaining to a style of architecture with pointed arches, steep roofs, windows large in proportion to the wall spaces, and, generally, great height in proportion to the other dimensions. The style was prevalent in Western Europe from about 1200 to 1475 and the term Gothic was applied wit...
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Gothic

Primarily an architectural style that prevailed in western Europe from the twelfth through the fifteenth centuries, characterized by pointed arches, ribbed vaults, and flying buttresses, that made it possible to create stone buildings that reached great heights.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21532
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