Flute

A long narrow grove, resulting from the removal of an elongated channel flake, which extends from the basal edge of a projectile for some distance along the face. Used to thin the hafting area.

flute

A long, narrow flake removed from a spear point to aid in the binding of the point to the spear shaft.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21815

Flute

The flute is a family of musical instrument of the woodwind group. Unlike woodwind instruments with reeds, a flute is an aerophone or reedless wind instrument that produces its sound from the flow of air across an opening. According to the instrument classification of Hornbostel–Sachs, flutes are categorized as edge-blown aerophones. A musician ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flute

flute

(from the article `glacial landform`) The depositional equivalent of erosional knob-and-tail structures (see above) are known as flutes. Close to the lower margin, some glaciers ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/40

flute

(from the article `hand tool`) ...at which the crank is turned. The one-directional motion allowed better drills to be designed, and, with their greater efficiency in chip ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/40

flute

(from the article `molding`) ...quarter-ellipse, or similar curve. (2) A scotia molding is similar to the cavetto but has a deeper concavity partially receding beyond the face of ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/40

flute

[n] - a tall narrow wineglass 2. [n] - a groove or furrow in cloth etc especially the shallow concave groove on the shaft of a column 3. [n] - a high-pitched woodwind instrument 4. [v] - form flutes in
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=flute

Flute

• (v. t.) To play, whistle, or sing with a clear, soft note, like that of a flute. • (n.) A similar channel or groove made in wood or other material, esp. in plaited cloth, as in a lady`s ruffle. • (n.) A long French breakfast roll. • (v. i.) A channel of curved section; -- usually applied to one of a vertical series of such cha...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/flute/

flute

champagne flute noun a tall narrow wineglass
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

flute

transverse flute noun a high-pitched woodwind instrument; a slender tube closed at one end with finger holes on one end and an opening near the closed end across which the breath is blown
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Flute

[glacial] A glacial flute is a landform created by the movement of a glacier around a boulder. They are long ridges on the ground parallel to the movement. Examples can be found in many places including Iceland, Alaska and Canada. As glaciers move along the surface of the earth, rocks are slowly mixed in with the ice. Rocks may reach the bo...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flute_(glacial)

Flute

[Western concert]
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flute_(Western_concert)

Flute

Flute (flūt) noun [ Confer French flûte a transport, Dutch fluit .] A kind of flyboat; a storeship. Armed en flûte (Nav.) , partially armed.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/50

Flute

Flute intransitive verb [ Middle English flouten , floiten , Old French flaüter , fleüter , flouster , French flûter , confer Dutch fluiten ; ascribed to an assumed Late Latin flautare , flatuare , from Latin flatus a blowing...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/50

Flute

Flute noun [ Middle English floute , floite , from Old French flaüte , flahute , flahuste , French fl...te ; confer Late Latin flauta , Dutch fluit . See Flute , intransitive verb ] 1. A musical wind i...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/50

Flute

Flute transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Fluted ; present participle & verbal noun Fluting .] 1. To play, whistle, or sing with a clear, soft note, like that of a flute. « Knaves are men, That lute and flute
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/50

Flute

a deep channel cut in wood occasionally denotes the cannel of a gouge.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary096.htm

Flute

A drinking glass with a tall deep conical bowl. Also a vertical groove cut into a stem or bowl.
Found on http://www.glamorganantiques.co.uk/glossaryglass.htm

Flute

Flute is a bellows-mender in
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/K2.HTM

flute

flute, in music, generic term for such wind instruments as the fife, the flageolet, the panpipes, the piccolo, and the recorder. The tone of all flutes is produced by an airstream directed against an edge, producing eddies that set up vibrations in the air enclosed in the attached tube. In the trans...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0819008.html

Flûte

“flute”; usually a very thin baguette; also, form of champagne glass.
Found on http://www.patriciawells.com/glossary/

Flute

In architecture a flute or fitting is a channel of curved section; the term is usually applied to one of a vertical series of such channels used to decorate columns and pilasters in classical architecture. They are used in all the orders except the Tuscan.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TF.HTM

Flute

Paper pleat between the walls in corrugated cardboard.
Found on http://www.e-printing.co.uk/glossary.htm

Flute

Press together two pastry layers on edge of pie crust, sealing the dough and at the same time creating a decorative edge using fingers, a fork, or other utensil.
Found on http://www.wrenscottage.com/kitchen/glossary.php

flute

Side-blown woodwind instrument with a long history, capable of intricate melodies and a wide range of expression. The player holds the flute horizontally, and to the right, and blows across an end hole. The air current is split by the opposite edge of the hole, causing the air column inside the i...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0001347.html
No exact match found